Default Passwords on Gov Websites – What Could Go Wrong?

You would think that in 2020 we wouldn’t have to tell people not to use default passwords.

You would certainly think that we wouldn’t have to tell government IT folks not to do that.

But if you thought that, apparently, you would have thought wrong.

We are still telling end users to change the password on their WiFi router. And on their Internet modem or firewall. But those are consumers.

We recently did a penetration test for a client. The client has a lot of locations.

For the most part, their Cisco ASA firewalls were secure.

Except for a couple of them.

Which still had the default password. At that point, we owned their entire network.

Fast forward to last month. The FBI said, privately, that foreign actors had successfully penetrated some government networks and stole source code.

Now we are getting at least some of the rest of the story. We still don’t know which agencies were hacked and what was stolen, but we do know how.

SonarQube is an open source application to help companies or agencies improve code quality through continuous static code analysis.

But if you put that on a public facing web site and you don’t change the default password – which is a really hard to guess “admin/admin”, you kind of have a problem.

I don’t understand enough about how SonarQube works, but it seems to me that it SHOULD NOT be exposed publicly and it probably should not be on production servers.

Here it is, at the tail end of 2020 and we are still telling people – IT people – to change the freaking password.

And security folks have been talking about this specific problem with SonarQube for a couple of years now and not just inside the gov.

Come on folks – get with the program. Hopefully what was stolen was not too sensitive but the fact that they are not telling us who was hacked and what was stolen probably means that it was sensitive. Credit: ZDNet

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