News Bites for the Week Ending November 23, 2018

Japan’s Cybersecurity Minister has Never Used a Computer

Yoshitaka Sakurada, the deputy chief of Japan’s cybersecurity strategy office and the minister in charge of the 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo says that he doesn’t use computers – basically, he has secretaries and employees to do that.  He also acted confused about whether Japan’s nuke plants use USB drives.

While a few people joked that he has mastered cybersecurity (which of course is not true unless he plans to shut down all of Japan’s computers), most people were amazed that the government put someone with absolutely no understanding of cybersecurity, never mind no expertise, in charge. Source: The Guardian .

Suspect Remotely Wipes iPhone that Police Seized as Evidence

Juelle Grant is a suspect in a shooting in New York in October.  Police think she was the driver and hid the shooter’s identity and hid the gun.

Apparently Grant tried to out-think the police and used Apple’s find my phone feature to do a remote wipe of the phone.

The cops were not amused and charged her with tampering with evidence and hindering prosecution.  The police could have foiled her by putting the phone in a $1.00 foil bag.

That she was able to successfully do this is indicative of the up hill battle that police face shifting from a world of cops walking a beat to a world of cyber experts.  Source: Apple Insider.

China’s Response to Tariffs – Increase Hacking

According to a U.S. government report released recently, China’s response to U.S. tariffs is to increase, not decrease hacking.  The tariffs, which were put in place due to unfair business practices, including hacking, were supposed to get China to reduce hacking our intellectual property, but according to the report, has in fact, had the opposite effect.

The report says that Chinese hacking efforts aimed at stealing American technology and trade secrets have “increased in frequency and sophistication” this year.

The Chinese appear to be interested in stealing information on artificial intelligence and other technologies and includes a “sharp rise” in hacking against manufacturers.

What this means is that U.S. need to take efforts to protect themselves.  Source: Real Clear Defense .

 

Adobe Releases Yet Another Emergency Fix For Flash

In the “gee, what a surprise” category, the pile of Band-Aids (R) that some people call Adobe Flash released yet another emergency patch for a bug that would allow an attacker to run arbitrary malicious code on a user’s device by getting them to visit a web page that had, for example, a malicious ad on it.

Adobe has announced that they will discontinue support by the end of 2020, which means that we still have years of emergency patches in the wings, followed by hacks for new bugs that are never going to be patched.  Source: CyberScoop.

 

Just Visiting a Website Could Have Hacked Your Mac

A bug in Safari allowed an attacker to take over your Mac simply by getting you to visit some web page.  The bug, now patched, would have allowed an attacker to own any Mac.  The researchers released a video and proof of concept code now that the hole has been closed.  That, of course, does not mean that other hackers didn’t know about it already.

Attacks are getting more sophisticated as vendors try to lock down their systems.  This exploit used three different Mac bugs to take over your computer.

No user involvement was required after the user opened a web page in Safari.  Source: The Hacker News.

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