Phishing Still Works

CSO Magazine has a great piece on social engineering/phishing scams.  The article quotes both vendors that we resell – Wombat and KnowBe4.

Bottom line – the Verizon 2016 data breach report says that 30 percent of the phishing emails were opened compared to 23 percent last year.  12 percent clicked on the link.

If 12 percent of the folks in your company clicked on a malicious link, YOU. ARE. TOAST!

Stu Sjouwerman, CEO and Founder of KnowBe4, an anti-phishing and security education provider says that “a handful of competing cyber mafias are casting their nets wider and wider.”  What this means is that the bad guys have launched an all out assault and situations like the ones that I wrote about the last two days – one company closed its doors, the other lost north of $40 million  – are likely the tip of the iceberg.

One cyber mafia alone netted close to $100 million during the first half of 2016.  That’s a pretty good incentive to hack since it is all tax free.

McAfee recorded 1.3 million new ransomware samples in the first half of this year.

The most commonly successful phishes?

  1. It looked official. – Wombat, a competitor to KnowBe4, says that users are better at detecting personal phishing attacks but do poorly with work related ones.  I guess that is how the hack of Leoni worked.  Send an email from the CFO to accounting, asking them to wire $40 mil to the Czech Republic and DONE!
  2. You missed a voicemail.  Attachments that are designed to look like voicemail messages get people to click,.  And get their computers infected.  You click on it and they own your computer.
  3. Free stuff. People cannot resist free stuff.  Even stuff that they down’t want and won’t use.  if it is free, they want it.  Of course the hackers attach an extra prize to the free stuff.  Once that piece of malware is installed after you click, things won’t seem so free any more.
  4. Fake social media invitations.  LinkedIn, Facebook.  Whatever.  If YOU don’t have a FB or LI account then a scammer can create one using your name.  Then invite your friends.  Or maybe the fake account belongs to the CEO.  Who wouldn’t accept his invitation.  Now they can steal your information or get you to click on a malicious link.
  5. Social Media at Work.  If your company allows you to use twitter, etc.  Wombat says that employees missed an average of 31 percent of the social media question on their tests.  Since most organizations allow employees to use social media at work but a third of the time users cannot detect malicious activities, what does that say about keeping the bad guys out?

Part of it is that the bad guys are getting better.  Much better.  I look at some of the malware and it is very impressive.

What is an organization to do?

If you are not actively phishing your employees on a regular basis (at least once a month, if not more) with very realistic phishing emails, you are missing a training opportunity.  And the cost is very reasonable.  Contact us for details.

Information for this post came from CSO Magazine.

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