Security News for the Week Ending August 21, 2020

August 13th, a Day That Will Live in Confusion

August 13th is the day that Part B of Section 889 of the 2019 National Defense Authorization Act went into effect. It bans the use of equipment and services tied to certain Chinese companies that have been deemed security threats by the United States. Companies that have this equipment won’t be able to sell to the federal government without a waiver. Contractors have 24 hours to report if they discover, after August 13th, that they are breaking the law. But contractors are allowed to self certify. While the ban went into effect on August 13th, the GSA training session for contractors has been delayed until mid-September – because they weren’t ready to coherently explain the rules. Ellen Lord, chief of the Pentagon’s acquisition branch asks contractors to take notes on how this is screwing up their business so that, maybe, they can get Congress to change the law. By the way, this is not a contract flow down clause, so primes are responsible for what their subs do, I guess. Sorry contractors. Credit: Federal Computer Weekly

Senators Say WikiLeaks Likely Knew He Was Helping Russia

The US Senate Select Committee on Intelligence says, in a report, that Vladimir Putin personally ordered the hacking of the DNC and WikiLeaks likely knew that it was helping Russia. The Senate report says WikiLeaks received internal DNC memos FROM Russian hackers. Senators wrote that Trump’s campaign staff sought advance notice of WikiLeaks releases. Paul Manafort is named as the person who was the link between the campaign and Russia. It seems odd that this Republican controlled committee would release this report days before the Republican National Convention’s nomination of Trump for President. Credit: The Register

Hide Your Breach – Go to Jail

The Feds have charged Uber’s Chief Security Officer with hiding information about the breaches they had in 2014 and 2016 and about payments they made to the hackers to keep the breach quiet. He is being charged with obstruction of justice and misprision of a felony (i.e. hiding it). He faces up to 8 years in prison if convicted. Credit: DoJ

Ever Wonder What Happens to All That Location Data that Apps Collect?

Well, the answer to that is, it depends. This week we found out one thing that happens to that data. The U.S. Secret Service buys it and uses it instead of having to get a warrant to get that same information from the phone company. Nothing illegal about it. Obviously, the Secret Service is not using it to market any products. Curiously, the company that they bought it from does not advertise that they sell your data to the police. In fact, their agreement, similar to the agreement that Stingray’s provider makes the police sign, says that they are forbidden from mentioning it in legal proceedings at all. When this has been an issue with Stingray’s the police have dropped charges rather than break the agreement. Credit: Hackread

Securus Sued For Recording Attorney-Client Jail Calls and Providing to Police

Securus provides pay phone services in prisons at what most people say are exorbitant prices. Sometimes they charge 100 times the going price outside. According to theory (and law), Securus is not supposed to listen to or record phone calls between inmates and their lawyers. The only reason they were caught was that a detective was listening to recordings provided to him by Securus and recognized the attorney’s voice. He then reported Securus to the Attorney General. The attorney who was illegally recorded is now suing Securus. The interesting thing is that Securus just settled a similar case in another state. You would think they would learn. Credit: The Register

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