Tag Archives: Akamai

Security News for the Week Ending June 19, 2020

Akamai Sees Largest DDoS Attack Ever

Cloudflare says that one of its customers was hit with a 1.44 terabit per second denial of service attack. A second attack topped 500 megabits per second. The used a variety of amplification techniques that required some custom coding on Akamai’s part to control, but the client was able to weather the attack. Credit: Dark Reading

Vulnerability in Trump Campaign App Revealed Secret Keys

Trump’s mobile campaign app exposed Twitter application keys, Google apps and maps keys and Branch.io keys. The vulnerability did not expose user accounts, it would have allowed an attacker to impersonate the app and cause significant campaign embarrassment. This could be due to sloppy coding practices or the lack of a secure development lifecycle. Credit: SC Magazine

FBI and Homeland Use Military-Style Drones to Surveil Protesters

Homeland Security has been using a variety of techniques, all likely completely legal, to keep track of what is going on during the recent protests.

Customs (part of DHS) has Predator drones, for example. Predator drones have been used in Iraq and other places. Some versions carry large weapons such as missiles. These DHS drones likely only carry high resolution spy cameras (that can, reportedly, read a license plate from 20,000 feet up) and cell phone interception equipment such as Stingrays and Crossbows. Different folks have different opinions as to whether using the same type of equipment that we use to hunt down terrorists is appropriate to use on U.S. soil, but that is a conversation for some other place. Credit: The Register

Hint: If You Plan to Commit Arson, Wear a Plain T-Shirt

A TV news chopper captured video of a masked protester setting a police car on fire. Two weeks later, they knocked on her door and arrested her for arson.

How? She was wearing a distinctive T-Shirt, sold on Etsy, which led investigators to her LinkedIn page and from there to her profile on Poshmark. While some are saying that is an invasion of privacy, I would say that the Feds are conducting open source intelligence (OSINT). The simple solution is to wear a plain T-Shirt. If you are committing a felony, don’t call attention to yourself. Credit: The Philly Inquirer

Ad-Tech Firm BlueKai has a bit of a Problem

BlueKai, owned by Oracle, had billions of records exposed on the Internet due to an unprotected database. This data is collected from an amazing array of sources from tracking beacons on web pages and emails to data that they buy from a variety of sources. Apparently the source of the breach is not Oracle it self but rather two companies Oracle does business with. They have not said whether those companies were customers, partners or suppliers and they haven’t publicly announced the breach. If there were California or EU residents in the mix, it could get expensive. The California AG has refused to say whether Oracle has told them, but this will not go away quietly or quickly. Credit: Tech Crunch