Tag Archives: Apple

What is YOUR Level of Paranoia?

A Houston lawyer is suing Apple alleging that Apple’s Facetime bug (still not fixed) that allowed people to eavesdrop even if you do not answer the call, allowed a private deposition to be recorded.

If you are among the geek crowd you probably know that the most paranoid person around, Edward Snowden, required reporters to put their phones in the freezer (not to keep them cold, but rather the metal box of the freezer kept radio waves out) when they were talking to him.

The lawyer is calling the bug a defective product breach and said that Apple failed to provide sufficient warnings and instructions.

I am not intimately familiar with Apple’s software license agreement, but assuming it is like every other one I have seen, it says that they are not responsible for anything and it is completely up to you to decide if the software meets your needs.

That probably conflicts with various defective product laws, but if that strategy had much promise you would think some lawyer would have tried that tactic before.

But the problem with the iPhone and the lawsuit do point out something.

We assume that every user has some level of paranoia.  Everyone’s level varies and may be different for different situations.  We call that your Adjustable Level of Paranoia of ALoP (Thanks James!)

YOU need to consider your ALoP in a particular circumstance. 

You should have a default ALoP.  Depending on who you are, that might be low or high.  You will take different actions based on that.

In this case, if the lawyer was really interested in security, he should not have allowed recorders (also known as phones and laptops) into the room.  He also should have swept for bugs.

That is a trade-off for convenience.  But, that is the way security works.  Low ALoP means high convenience.  High ALoP means lower convenience.  Ask anyone who has worked in the DoD world.   If you work in a classified environment you cannot bring your phone into the building.  They have lockers to store them in if you do.  If you ignore that rule you can lose your clearance or even get prosecuted.

Bottom line is that you need to figure out what your ALoP is for a particular situation and make adjustments accordingly.

Suing Apple will not solve this attorney’s problem.  There will be more software bugs.  I promise this was NOT the last one.

But the lawyer will get his 15 seconds of fame before the suit is settled or dismissed.

Source: ABC 13.

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Security News Bites for the Week Ending January 25, 2019

Oklahoma Government Data Left Unprotected

The Oklahoma Department of Securities left data going back to at least 1999 unprotected online.  Data exposed included state agency passwords and login information, data on FBI investigations, information on thousands of securities brokers and other information.  The state says it was unprotected for “a limited duration”.  They are investigating.  Source: The Hacker News.

 

NOYB Files More GDPR Complaints

None of Your Business, the non-profit founded by Austrian privacy activist, lawyer and Faceboook-thorn-in-their-side has filed 10 complaints with the Austrian Data Protection Authority.

They say that companies are not fully complying with the requirements of GDPR in providing data to requestors and some companies didn’t even bother to reply at all.  For the most part, they said that companies did not tell people who they shared data with, the source of the data or how long they stored it for.

Beware, this is only the beginning of challenges for companies that have built their business models on selling your data.  The press release also shows the MAXIMUM potential fine (not likely), which ranges from 20 million to 6.3 billion Euros.  Source: NOYB .

 

Another Zero Click WiFi Firmware Bug

Security researcher Denis Selianin has released the code for a WiFi firmware bug he presented a paper on last year.  The code works on ThreadX and Marvell Avastar WiFi driver code and allows an attacker to take over a system even if the device is not connected to WiFi.  Affected devices include the Sony Playstation 4, Microsoft Surface, Xbox One, Samsung Chromebook, Galaxy J1 and other devices.  All it takes is for the device to be powered on.

I am not aware of a patch for the firmware of WiFi devices to fix this and likely, for most WiFi devices, the risk will remain active until the device winds up in a landfill or recycling center, even if a patch is released.  Source:  Helpnet Security.

 

Apple Releases Patches For iPhone, Mac and Wearables

Apple has released patches for the iPhones (and other i-devices) that include several remote code execution bugs (vulnerabilities that can be exploited remotely) including FaceTime, Bluetooth and 8 bugs in the Webkit web browser.  The iOS kernel had 6 vulnerabilities patched that allowed an attacker to elevate his or her privilege level.

The macOS had similar patches since much of the same software runs on the Mac, but there were Mac unique bugs as well.

Rounding out the patch set were patches for the Apple watch and Apple TV.

At one time Apple software was simpler and therefore less buggy, but over time it has gotten more complex and therefore more vulnerable.  Source: The Register.

Data Analytics Firm Ascension Reveals 24 Million Mortgage Related Documents

Ascension, a data analytics firm, left a stash of 24 million mortgage related documents exposed.  it is not clear who owns the data belonging to tens of thousands of loans, but it appears that the originators of the loans include Citi, Wells, Capital One and HUD.  Ascension’s parent company Rocktop, owns a portfolio of 46,000 loans, but we don’t know if these are theirs.

While they think the loan documents were only exposed for a few weeks, that is certainly enough time for a bad guy to find them.  After all, a researcher found them. Now Ascension is having to notify all of the affected parties and I am sure that the lawsuits will begin shortly.

If this isn’t a poster child for making sure that your VENDOR CYBER RISK MANAGEMENT PROGRAM is in order, I don’t know what to say.

This could be a third party cyber risk problem *OR* it could be a fourth party cyber risk problem.  In either case, if your vendor cyber risk management house is not in order, it will likely be YOUR problem.  Now would be a good time to review your program.  Source:  Housingwire.

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Apple Didn’t Get It Quite Right – Again

Parental controls are generally a good thing.

Except when it blocks the wrong sites and lets the bad sites  through.

So what is Apple doing in this case?

Sites that are blocked: Scarleteen and O.school, which are sex education sites and Teen Vogue.

Sites that are OK: The Daily Stormer, a neo-nazi site that publishes articles about how women secretly like to be raped.

Web searches like “how to say no to sex”, “sex assault hotline” and “sex education” were all blocked.

But “how to poison my mom”, “how to join isis” and “how to make a bomb” were all okay.

Suffice it to say, Apple has a bit of work to do.

Apple did not respond to Motherboard’s request to explain what is going on.

This is a new feature in iOS 12 and if you remember what happened when Apple released it’s mapping program (like telling people to drive into the ocean), it takes some work to get this right.

There are lots more examples in the article, some rated a little less PG so I am not including them here.

My recommendation – if you want to block content, you should probably discuss that with your kids.  The Internet is a bit of a cesspool and for young kids, some protection is probably in order.  You should find a paid product (that has support available) that has been around for a while and has good reviews.  Apple, apparently, doesn’t fit into that category.  YET.

Information for this post came from Motherboard.

 

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Security News Bites for Week Ending Sep 21, 2018

New Web Attack Will Crash Your iPhone, iPad or Mac

A new CSS-based web attack will crash and restart your i-device with just 15 lines of code.  The code exploits a weakness in iOS’ web rendering engine WebKit, which Apple mandates all apps and browsers use. Anything that renders HTML on iOS is affected. That means anyone sending you a link on Facebook or Twitter, or if any webpage you visit includes the code, or anyone sending you an email. TechCrunch tested the exploit running on the most recent mobile software iOS 11.4.1, and confirm it crashes and restarts the phone.  Source:  Techcrunch

Ajit Pai Says California Net Neutrality Law Radical and Illegal

Ajit Pai, Chairman of the FCC and the guy who repealed the FCC net neutrality policy said that California’s new bill replacing that repealed FCC policy is illegal.   Why?  Because, he says, that it is preempted by Federal law.  This is the same guy who said the FCC didn’t have the power to regulate net neutrality.  Do they?  Don’t they?  Are you confused too?

If Pai intervenes, I am sure this will go all the way up to the Supreme Court – who may or may not hear the argument.

He said this at a talk conservative think thank in Portland.  Maine, like about 30 other states, is in the process of creating its own net neutrality law.  If he thought that the states would bow down to him when he repealed the FCC policy, apparently, he was wrong.

Also apparently, his beef is with zero rating, a practice where a carrier doesn’t charge you if you use their service or use a service that has paid them a lot of money, but does charge you to use a service who has not written them a big check.  His theory, apparently, is that if poor people must (due to financial constraints) use only those services that write a carrier a big check, that will, somehow, promote an open and innovative Internet.  Source:  Motherboard

Another Day, Another Crypto Currency Exchange Hacked

Japanese crypto currency exchange Zaif was hacked to the tune of $60 Million of Bitcoin, Bitcoin Cash and Monacoin.  About a third of that was owned by the exchange;  the rest owned by customers.

For now, withdrawals and deposits have been halted, with no specified time when it might – or might not – resume.  If ever.

The company says that they will compensate  users who lost $40 million or so and have sold the majority of the company for $5 billion yen (roughly the amount of money not owned by them that was stolen).

Assuming that deal actually closes, they figure out how the attack happened and fix the problem … and, and, and.  Japan’s financial regulator has stepped into the poop pile.

I assume that if and when customers actually get access to their money – the part that wasn’t stolen – they will find someplace else to store their crypto currency.  That likely means the end of Zaif, no matter what.

In the mean time, they will just have to hang out and wait to see what happens.  Source: Bloomberg.

3 Billion Malicious Logins Per Month This Year

According to Akamai, there were over 3 billion malicious logins per month between January and April and over 8 billion malicious logins during May and June at sites that they front end.

Many malicious login attempts come from the technique of credential stuffing where hackers take credentials exposed during hacks and try them on other web sites.  For example, try the 3 billion exposed Yahoo passwords on Facebook or online banking sites.  Even though we tell people not to reuse passwords, they do anyway.

According to Akamai, one large bank was experiencing 8,000 accounts being compromised per month.

One bank experienced over 8 million malicious login attempts in a single 48 hour period.  I bet some of these attempts worked.  A load like that will impact the bank’s ability to serve real customers.  Source:  Help Net Security.

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Security News Bites for the Week Ending August 31, 2018

Spyware Company Leaves Terabytes of Data Unprotected

Spyfone, a software company that allows parents to spy on their kids, spouses to spy on each other and employers to spy on employees allowed the world to spy on everyone.

The data left exposed on Amazon included photos, text messages, contacts, location information, Facebook messages and other information.

In addition to leaving all of their customer’s data exposed, their own backend servers were also left unprotected.

I guess you might call it Karma for spying on people.  Source: Motherboard.

California Tech Execs Pushing Feds to Reverse Cali Privacy Law

Between GDPR, CCPA and other new privacy laws, the tech industry is concerned that their business model is at risk.

As a result Google, Microsoft, IBM, Facebook and others are lobbying aggressively to the Trump administration and Congress to pass a weak federal privacy law that would usurp California’s law and make it easier for those companies to continue their business model as is.

Whatever happens in DC (don’t count on anything happening, but you never know), that won’t affect the changes in Europe and many other countries that are passing similar laws to the EU to allow those countries to do business with the EU.  Those laws will impact US businesses if they have customers in those countries.  While they could create one policy for the US and another for the rest of the world, that would be complicated.

Historically DC has tried to pass a national privacy law, but those past attempts have been much weaker than existing state laws, which has made it difficult to get enough votes to pass it.  A tough law will be heavily lobbied against.  This is why, unlike most other countries in the world, we have no national privacy law.  Source: NY Times .

Senator Wyden Confirms Stingrays Interfere with 911 Calls

Harris Communications, maker of the Stingray has confirmed that the feature which is designed to stop the Stingray from interfering with 911 calls was never tested and never confirmed to work.

Comforting.

As if that wasn’t a big enough problem, hobbyists can build a DIY Stingray for less than $1,000 in parts.

And, foreign spies are already using them in Washington, DC.

WHAT.  COULD,  GO,  WRONG??   Source: Tech Crunch

Apple Forces Facebook VPN App Out of App Store

Facebook recently bought a company named Onavo that makes a VPN app.  The claim is that it makes your browsing experience a more secure browsing experience.

Only problem is that they had an ulterior motive.  They – Facebook – was collecting data on every web page the user visited, every app that you used, every bit of data that you transferred.  While the bad guys couldn’t eavesdrop, Facebook could.  And did.

Well apparently Apple had enough of the duplicity and told Facebook to either voluntarily withdraw the app or they would do it for Facebook.  The app is now gone for iPhone users.  It is still available to Android users.  Source: The Hacker News.

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Security News Bites for the Week Ending Aug 24, 2018

FBI Asks Google for Information on ALL People Near Certain Crimes

Now that we know that Google tracks you even if you ask nicely for it not to, this news from BBC becomes more interesting.

The FBI issued a search warrant to Google for information on all people within a 100 acre block around a couple of crimes they were investigating in Portland.

Not only did they want location, but they also wanted full names and addresses, telephone numbers, records of session times and durations, date on which the account was created, length of service, IP address used to register the account, login IP addresses, email addresses, log files and means and source of payment.

Needless to say, all people within a 100 acre block of land is a lot of people and who are not particularly suspected of any crime.

Google declined the request and after about 6 months, the FBI withdrew the warrant request.  Source: BBC .

Maybe Apple’s Security is Not Perfect

A 16 year old Australian kid has been charged with hacking into Apple’s network multiple times over the course of a year successfully, downloading 90 gig of secure files and accessed customer data.

Because the kid is a minor and also because Apple is slightly embarrassed, the police are not saying much.  Source: The Age

Russians Target Senate Races and Conservative Think Tanks

While the President continues to say that the Russians are not targeting our political process, Microsoft has convinced our court system that they are and has seized several domains that were posing as Microsoft domains and were being run by the Russian spy agency GRU and created by the Russian hacker organization known as APT28/Fancy Bear/Strontium (everyone has to create the own name for the same group).  Microsoft claimed that the web sites could be used as a launch pad for attacks since they looked like official Microsoft web properties.  While the article doesn’t say so, I suspect that Microsoft detected actual attacks, otherwise why would they be so specific as to the targets?

The think tanks in question have been critical of Russia.

Russia, of course, is acting dumb and said what web sites and what do you mean impacting the elections.  No surprise there.

One of the think tanks is the Hudson Institute where Trump’s Director of National Intelligence recently said, in a speech, that the lights were “blinking red” like they were just before 9-11.  He was specifically referring, in this case, to Russian interference in the elections.

Microsoft is offering special security services to all political candidates. Source: CNN)

Another Nasty Apache Struts Vulnerability

Remember the Equifax breach?  The root cause of that was an unpatched computer running Apache Struts software.  Now there is another Apache Struts bug and this one is being called critical.   The common vulnerability risk score is 10 out of a possible 10.  Hard to get more critical than that.

Don’t use Struts?

Do you use Atlassian products?  Cisco?  Hitachi?  IBM?  Oracle?  VMWare?  Well then, you  might be using Struts (depends on exactly which product from those companies that you use). (Source: Risk Based Security )

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