Tag Archives: Covid-19

News Bites for the Week Ending March 27, 2020

Hacker Sells 538 Million Weibo Accounts

Karma is a B**tch.

With all of the Chinese hacking efforts, someone is hacking back.  Is it us?  Not clear.  In any case, the data includes information like real names, site names, location, etc. and 172 million of the 538 million records include users’ phone numbers, but not passwords.  The data is available for $250.  Given China’s iron grip on the Internet, they should be able to catch this guy.  Unless he is not in China.  Source: ZDNet

Pentagon Increases Progress Payments to Primes

The Pentagon is trying to keep the Defense Industrial Base afloat during these trying times by increasing so-called progress payments to primes and other measures.  Whether it will be enough to keep small subs in business is not clear, but what we have seen is that the bankruptcy courts have seen that these companies’ intellectual property as an asset and sells it off during liquidation – even selling defense information to the Chinese.  In theory, CFIUS should allow the government to stop these (and it absolutely can if it moves fast enough) and FIRRMA (aka CFIUS 2.0) gives the government even more power to stop it but the bankruptcy courts have, for the most part, thumbed their noses at it, possibly (kindly) because they are clueless about the risk.  Source: National Defense Magazine

Experts See Over 600 Percent Spike in Malicious Emails During Covid-19

Barracuda Networks researchers saw a 667% spike in malicious emails using Coronavirus.  The goal is to get you to click on malicious links or download attachments that include viruses.  They saw almost 10,000 coronavirus linked emails attacks in the last three weeks compared to 1,800 in February and less in January.  Phishing attacks are nothing if not tied to current events. Source: The Hill

Netflix Reduces Video Quality in Europe Over Bandwidth Crunch

According to Variety, Netflix uses one out of every eight bits traversing the Internet (12%).  As general  Internet usage goes up, Europe has asked Netflix and other streaming video providers to reduce their video quality from HD to SD.

“As a result of social distancing measures put in place across Europe to fight the Coronavirus pandemic, the demand for Internet capacity has increased, be it for teleworking, e-learning or entertainment purposes. This could put networks under strain at a moment when they need to be operational at the best possible level. In order to prevent congestion and to ensure the open Internet, Internal Market Commissioner Thierry Breton has called on the responsibility of streaming services, operators and users. Streaming platforms are advised to offer standard rather than high definition and to cooperate with telecom operators.”

Netflix has agreed to reduce its video stream bitrate by 25% for the next month.  Source: Bleeping Computer

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Weekly Security News for the Week Ending March 20, 2020

Senate Kicks the Can Down The Road Again With FISA Renewal

Last week it looked like Congress was going to renew the parts of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act that DID EXPIRE last weekend.  But Congress being Congress, they didn’t.  On Monday the Senate agreed to kick the can down the  road for 77  days.  Now the House has to agree.  In the meantime, I am not sure what the NSA is doing about those expired provisions and they only plan to kick the can down the road on two of the three expired provisions.  In fairness, Trump wants to reign in the Intelligence Community since he doesn’t trust them and never has.  This could work to the advantage of the privacy advocates.  Source: Reuters

Covid-19 Web Site President Said Google Would Bring Online Monday is Online But Not Like he Said

Google/Alphabet subsidiary Verily launched its Project Baseline Coronavirus website, but it is not national, it only covers two counties in the San Francisco Bay area.  It was supposed to allow people to make appointments to get tested, but the few slots that were available filled up instantly.  Only people living in those two counties are even allowed to use the site.

Google says that they are working on a nationwide INFORMATION ONLY site and it will be released sometime in the future.  Source: Bleeping Computer

Open Source Vulnerabilities Surge in 2019

Some people say that open source software is more secure.

Reality is a little different than that.

In 2019 DISCLOSED open source vulnerabilities surged from 4,000 to 6,000 last year.  The good news is that the open source community is good about fixing the vulnerabilities once they are found.  85% of the vulnerabilities  have a fix once they are responsibly disclosed.

Bottom line, make sure that you have an effective open source software patching program to keep your company safe. Source: Help Net Security

U.S. Census Figures Coronavirus Will Be Over in Two Weeks

The Census, that every 10 year event, was supposed to start this week.  But there is kind of an issue.  I think there is some kind of virus going around.  Part of how the Census works is that Census workers go around collecting information from people.  Given the current situation, (a) Census workers are probably not going to be willing to risk their health for a few bucks, (b) people that they visit are likely not going to let them in the door or (c) some other less than nice thing might happen.

So what did the geniuses at the Census  bureau decide to do?  They decided that they are going to send out Census workers in 13 days on April 1st. WHAT, EXACTLY, DO THEY EXPECT TO BE DIFFERENT IN 13 DAYS?

Ya gotta wonder about those folks in Washington.  Source: Reuters

OCR Lifts Penalties For Telehealth Use During Covid-19

Its all hands on deck.  HIPAA has a number of provisions that allow a healthcare provider to bypass certain HIPAA rules.  A pandemic is not one of those options.  Of course since the Feds make the rules, they can change them.  In light of the current situation, HHS says that they will not penalize Covered Entities for using telehealth providers who are not fully HIPAA compliant.  They are not saying using those providers is legal;  they are just saying, given the circumstances, they are not going to go after providers who do so.  This will allow providers to use apps like Facetime or Google Chat to diagnose patients instead making them come into the office and potentially infect dozens of other people.  It seems like a reasonable trade off.  Source: HealthIT Security

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