Tag Archives: Crash

Security News for the Week Ending September 3, 2021

Apple Offers Fixes For Broken iPhone 12s

While not exactly a security issue, Apple is offering to fix defective iPhone 12s that were made between October 2020 and April 2021 and which have a defective receiver module component. That is mighty kind of them since every single one of them is still under warranty and if you can’t hear sound on your phone, it is of lesser usefulness. Still, we are talking about Apple. Owners can take them to an Apple store or authorized repair center. Apple says you might want to back up your data first in case something bad happens. Credit: Bleeping Computer

Teslas on Autopilot Crash into Cop Cars

I don’t think it is intentional, but on more than one occasion, Teslas on autopilot have crashed into police cars. At night. On autopilot When they have their lights flashing. Those high intensity lights have occasionally blinded me at night so it doesn’t seem like much of a stretch that it could also bother Tesla’s cameras also. Right now they are investigating about a dozen of these crashes. Credit: Vice

Federal Departments Ordered to Improve System Logging to Respond to Incidents

As a result of the recent executive order on cybersecurity, the OMB has ordered federal agencies to begin outlining the steps they plan to take to improve their incident logging capabilities, including log retention and log management. You should assume this will flow down to you, even if you aren’t an agency and don’t sell to one. It is just good practice. Credit: Data Breach Today.

Teamsters Are Coming for Amazon’s Tax Breaks

This is not directly a security issue, but it does point out that there are many different forms of attacks and if one doesn’t work then the attackers might try a different one – as happens all the time with cyber attacks. I will let you read the details if you are interested, but the Teamsters have not been successful at winning union elections so they are changing tactics. When Amazon comes to a local government to ask for a tax break to add, according to the union, dangerous, depressed wage jobs, they launch a campaign asking the voters to explain why the city should give a tax break to one of the wealthiest companies in the country just so that they can create more dangerous, low paying jobs that will be automated out of existence as soon as Amazon can do it. Interesting tactic. Credit: Motherboard Vice

Industrial Control Systems Bugs Out of Control

In just the first six months of 2021 there were 637 bugs in products of 76 vendors affecting Industrial Control Systems. More than 70% of them are rated critical. Three quarters of the bugs do not require any privileges and two thirds can be exploited without any user involvement. Given all the attacks we have seen and the fact that ICS owners are very slow to deploy patches, expect hackers to start exploiting these and taking down factories, utilities and critical infrastructure. Credit: Security Week

Security News Bites for Week Ending Sep 21, 2018

New Web Attack Will Crash Your iPhone, iPad or Mac

A new CSS-based web attack will crash and restart your i-device with just 15 lines of code.  The code exploits a weakness in iOS’ web rendering engine WebKit, which Apple mandates all apps and browsers use. Anything that renders HTML on iOS is affected. That means anyone sending you a link on Facebook or Twitter, or if any webpage you visit includes the code, or anyone sending you an email. TechCrunch tested the exploit running on the most recent mobile software iOS 11.4.1, and confirm it crashes and restarts the phone.  Source:  Techcrunch

Ajit Pai Says California Net Neutrality Law Radical and Illegal

Ajit Pai, Chairman of the FCC and the guy who repealed the FCC net neutrality policy said that California’s new bill replacing that repealed FCC policy is illegal.   Why?  Because, he says, that it is preempted by Federal law.  This is the same guy who said the FCC didn’t have the power to regulate net neutrality.  Do they?  Don’t they?  Are you confused too?

If Pai intervenes, I am sure this will go all the way up to the Supreme Court – who may or may not hear the argument.

He said this at a talk conservative think thank in Portland.  Maine, like about 30 other states, is in the process of creating its own net neutrality law.  If he thought that the states would bow down to him when he repealed the FCC policy, apparently, he was wrong.

Also apparently, his beef is with zero rating, a practice where a carrier doesn’t charge you if you use their service or use a service that has paid them a lot of money, but does charge you to use a service who has not written them a big check.  His theory, apparently, is that if poor people must (due to financial constraints) use only those services that write a carrier a big check, that will, somehow, promote an open and innovative Internet.  Source:  Motherboard

Another Day, Another Crypto Currency Exchange Hacked

Japanese crypto currency exchange Zaif was hacked to the tune of $60 Million of Bitcoin, Bitcoin Cash and Monacoin.  About a third of that was owned by the exchange;  the rest owned by customers.

For now, withdrawals and deposits have been halted, with no specified time when it might – or might not – resume.  If ever.

The company says that they will compensate  users who lost $40 million or so and have sold the majority of the company for $5 billion yen (roughly the amount of money not owned by them that was stolen).

Assuming that deal actually closes, they figure out how the attack happened and fix the problem … and, and, and.  Japan’s financial regulator has stepped into the poop pile.

I assume that if and when customers actually get access to their money – the part that wasn’t stolen – they will find someplace else to store their crypto currency.  That likely means the end of Zaif, no matter what.

In the mean time, they will just have to hang out and wait to see what happens.  Source: Bloomberg.

3 Billion Malicious Logins Per Month This Year

According to Akamai, there were over 3 billion malicious logins per month between January and April and over 8 billion malicious logins during May and June at sites that they front end.

Many malicious login attempts come from the technique of credential stuffing where hackers take credentials exposed during hacks and try them on other web sites.  For example, try the 3 billion exposed Yahoo passwords on Facebook or online banking sites.  Even though we tell people not to reuse passwords, they do anyway.

According to Akamai, one large bank was experiencing 8,000 accounts being compromised per month.

One bank experienced over 8 million malicious login attempts in a single 48 hour period.  I bet some of these attempts worked.  A load like that will impact the bank’s ability to serve real customers.  Source:  Help Net Security.