Tag Archives: EternalBlue

Security News Bytes for the Week Ending June 7, 2019

More Information on the Baltimore Cyberattack

Baltimore estimates that it will wind up spending $18 million to recover from the cyberattack – which is why many organization just pay the ransom.  The attackers only wanted $103,000 or less than 1 percent of what they are going to spend.  Of course, if an organization does that, they will still be vulnerable to another attack and will have no idea whether the attacker will remain inside their systems, slowly stealing data, for the rest of eternity.

The city is blaming the feds for the breach due to the use of NSA’s leaked spy tool EternalBlue and want federal aid to fix their mess, although there are also conflicting reports that say that EternalBlue evidence was not found in the city’s network.

Baltimore’s information technology office issued a[n undated] detailed warning that the city was using computer systems that were out of date, highly vulnerable to attack and not backed up, calling them “a natural target for hackers and a path for more attacks in the system. (based on contents of the memo, it was likely written in late 2017 or 2018)”

The reality is that patches for EternalBlue have been out for more than a year – but not installed in Baltimore.   Who’s fault is that?  Like many organizations, Baltimore just chose to prioritize spending money on other things rather than protecting their systems and their customer’s data.  Source: Cyberwire (no link) and the Baltimore Sun.

GandCrab Ransomware Shutting Down After Getting $2.5 BILLION

Smart people know when to stop.  Apparently the hackers behind GandCrab have decided that $2.5 billion is enough and have ordered their “affiliates” to stop distributing the  ransomware after an 18 month run.  The operators claim to have generated $2.5 million a week over those 18 months and cashed out $150 million, which they have “invested”.  Of course, other malware will replace it, but the sheer magnitude of this one is amazing.  Source:  Bleeping Computer.

Two Different Medical Labs Announce Breach – Both Use the Same Third Party Billing Vendor

First it was Quest Diagnostics announcing that 12 million customer records including credit card and bank account information, medical information and Socials were compromised.  Now it is Lab Corp saying that almost 8 million of their customer records were exposed.

Both tie back to the same vendor – AMCA – American Medical Collection Agency.  Given both of these biggies used it, likely there are many more small companies that also used it.

Labcorp said, in an SEC filing, that the hackers were inside for 9 months before they were detected at AMCA.

One more time, third party vendors put companies that trusted them at risk.   In this case, there is the added pain that this is a HIPAA violation and a pretty big one at that.  That is why vendor cyber risk management is so important.

Quest says that it has fired the vendor and hired its own investigators; they say that they have not gotten sufficient information from AMCA.  Remember, you can outsource the task, but not the liability.  Hopefully everyone has a lot of cyber-risk insurance.

Source: Brian Krebs.

Millions of EXIM Mail Agents Are At Risk

What could go wrong.  Millions of EXIM mail transfer agents, typically used on Unix-like systems, are vulnerable to both remote and local attacks.  The attack allows a hacker to remotely execute commands on the target system with the permissions of root.

The bug was patched in February, but it was not listed as a security fix, so likely many sysadmins did not install the patch.  Shodan shows 4.8 million servers running the software and only 588,000 running the fix.  Most of those servers are in the U.S.  Source: Bleeping Computer.

The AMCA Data Breach Keeps Growing

AMCA is a company you probably never heard of before this week.  They are a medical claims collection agency.  As I said above, first it was Quest with 12 million customers affected;  then it was LabCorp with another 7+ million customers.

One assumes that AMCA has lots of customers and depending on the nature of their systems, probably all of their customers were compromised, although it is possible that each customer was isolated from all of the others – but that doesn’t seem to be the case.

Now OPKO Health is saying that 400,000 of their customers information was compromised.  Expect that there will be more customers coming forward in the weeks ahead.

This is the risk that you have when you use outside parties – breaches that you don’t control but have to pay for anyway – both financially and in brand damage.  If you have not already figured out how to protect yourself as best as possible, now is the time to do it because once you get that phone call from your vendor – it is too late.  Source: Bleeping Computer.

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Security News for the Week Ending May 31, 2019

Baltimore Ransomware Attack Could Be Blamed on the NSA

I think this is what they call a tease.

Technically correct, however.

You may remember the NSA hacking tool that got out into the wild called EternalBlue?  It was leaked by the hacking group ShadowBrokers in 2017.  Before that, it exploited a Microsoft  bug that the NSA decided was  too juicy to tell Microsoft to fix – for five years.  Then it got out.  Now North Korea, China, Russia and others are using it.

So who’s fault is it?  Should the government tell vendors to fix bugs or should they risk not telling them and having a Baltimore or WannaCry which destroyed the British Healthcare system or NotPetya or many others.

Certainly you could blame ShadowBrokers, but as we have seen with other malware, as soon as you use it, you run the risk of it being detected and used against you.

In this case, I blame Baltimore because Microsoft patched the flaw in March 2017 and apparently, it is not deployed in Baltimore.

Three weeks and counting, Baltimore is still trying to undo the damage.  For lack of a patch.  To be fair, it might have happened anyway.  But it would not have spread like wildfire.   Source:  NY Times.

First. Time. Ever! – Moody’s Downgrades Equifax Due to Breach

Turnabout *IS* fair.

For the first time ever, Equifax is discovering what they do to others all the time when they downgrade consumer’s credit scores.

In this case, it is Moody’s that is downgrading Equifax’s score.

Moody’s downgraded Equifax from STABLE to NEGATIVE.

Likely because they just announced that they have spent $1.35 Billion fixing the breach damage and none of the lawsuits are settled yet.  This is likely to be the costliest breach ever.  Source: CNBC.

 

Cisco Warns Thangrycat Fix May Destroy Your Hardware

More information has come out about the Cisco Trust Anchor vulnerability called Thrangrycat.  The trust anchor is the root of all security in Cisco devices and if it gets compromised, then there is no security in the device at all.

The good news is that the hackers who found it said it was hard to find, BUT, now that the hackers know what to look for, expect an attack kit to show up for a few bucks on the dark web.

The problem is that Cisco has to reprogram a piece of hardware inside all of those switches, routers and firewalls.  THAT MUST BE DONE ONSITE.  Worse yet, there is a possibility that the reprogramming could turn your firewall into a really expensive brick.

Cisco says that if your device is under warranty or if you have a maintenance contract and they brick your device, they will mail you a new one.  The device will be down until you get the new one.

I am sure they will try hard not to brick things, but reprogramming FPGAs on the fly – its not simple and things could go wrong.

IF, however, you do not have a warranty or maintenance contract and the device gets bricked, you are on your own.

For those people, now might be the time to replace that Cisco gear with someone else’s.  That won’t be perfect either, however.  Source: Techtarget.

 

New Zealand Cryptocurrency Firm Hacked To Death

As I keep pointing out, “investing” in cryptocurrency is much like gambling with no insurance and no hedge.

In this case Cryptopia , a New Zealand based cyptocurrency exchange is filing for bankruptcy and still has millions in digital assets that belong to its customers.

But maybe not for long because their IT provider says that they owe millions and is threatening to take down the servers that contain the digital assets.  In the meantime, customers wait.  Source: Bloomberg.

 

Flipboard Says Hackers Were Roaming Inside For NINE Months Before Being Detected

Flipboard admitted that hackers were inside their systems from nine months between June 2018 and March 2019 and then again in April 2019, when they were detected.

Flipboard says that user passwords, which were salted and strongly hashed, were taken.  What they didn’t say, because they are not forced to by law, was what else was taken.  According to the security firm Crowdstrike, the best hackers move laterally from the system in which they entered, in 18 minutes.  The average hackers take 10 hours.  Where did they move in nine months?

If they want me to believe that nothing else was taken, they must think I am a fool.  I am not.  But the law doesn’t require them to tell you what else was taken.

Since they are not publicly traded, they don’t have to tell the SEC what else was taken.  In fact, they only have to tell the SEC if it materially affects the company – a term which is conveniently not defined.  Source: ZDNet.

Turnabout – Part Two

While President Trump shouts about Huawei spying for the Chinese, the Chinese are removing all Windows systems from their military environment due to fear of hacking by the US.   While this won’t have any significant financial impact on Microsoft, it is kind of a poke in their eye.

For some strange reason, they are not going to use Linux, but rather develop their own OS.  One reason might be that a unknown proprietary OS that only the Chinese military has the source code for would be harder to hack by the US than any other OS.  Source: ZDNet.

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