Tag Archives: Hamas

Security News for the Week Ending May 10, 2019

Hackers Wiping Github and Other Repos

Hackers are attacking repositories of users on Github, Gitlab and Bitbucket, leaving a ransom note that says pay up if you want your software back.

The ransom isn’t much – around $500, – which may cause people to pay up rather than trying to recover the data, which I assume is their strategy.

One possibility is that users have the password embedded in other repositories in clear text and the hackers were able to find those passwords.

Key point here is to make sure that you have backups OF ALL OF YOUR CLOUD BASED DATA.  Today it is Github;  tomorrow it is something else.  If you care about your data, make sure that it is securely backed up.  Offline backups are best because it is hard to wipe something that is not connected.  Source: Bleeping Computer.

 

Remember Shadow Brokers – China Already Had the Tools That Were Released

Remember all the fury a few years ago when Shadow Brokers released a whole bunch of NSA hacking tools?  Symantec now says that China already had those tool a year earlier and was using them against others.  Was NSA hacked?  Apparently not – China captured the NSA tools that were being used on them and repurposed them.

It is hard to keep these tools under check.  If you use them people will likely discover that fact and if they are motivated, they may use them against you.   In this case, China used them hacking targets in at least 5 countries including one telecom carrier where they got access to hundreds of thousands or millions of private communications.

After Shadow Brokers released the tools, China felt even bolder to use them because now they weren’t secret any more and would soon be patched.

Keeping these secrets under wraps is basically impossible.  Source:  The NY Times.

Israel Blows Up Palestinian Hackers

In an unusual move, Israel blew up a building that it said was used by Hamas for cyber attacks – in direct response to current or future Hamas cyber attacks, according to a press release from the IDF.

Neither side is saying much beyond that Israel did blow up the building.  No one is saying if there were casualties.

Apparently this facility was known to the Israelis.  This points to the likely escalation of cyber war into kinetic war as large countries fear what small countries can do in cyberspace.  This likely causes an escalation into cyber warriors operating out of spaces which would cause collateral damage if bombed, such as schools, hospitals and shopping malls.  Source: Gizmodo.

 

A Few More Details On Cyber Attack Against Western US Power Utility

We are hearing a few more details about the cyber attack on a so-far unnamed western US power utility.

The attackers, it is now being anonymously reported disabled the utility’s Cisco ASAs.  This is particularly scary since Cisco is pretty much the 800 pound gorilla in that space and their Adaptive Security Appliance is used by hundreds of thousands (or more) of businesses.  It is certainly possible that the ASAs were configured insecurely or missing patches (security patches are typically not available to owners unless they have a paid up maintenance plan, which I HOPE an electric utility would have).

Given how critical the electrical grid is in the US and how fragile it is, this is a bit of a wake up call for those utilities (water, power, gas, phone, Internet, etc.) that have not yet drunk the security Kool-Aid.  Source: EENews.

 

Navy May Be Getting Serious About Cybersecurity

Last year the Navy decided that having a CIO was superfluous and eliminated the position as unnecessary (See article).   They decided that the Undersecretary of the Navy could manage all those pesky IT and security details in his spare time.

In March the Navy released a SCATHING report on how bad their cybersecurity really was.  Now they are working on asking Congress to approve adding a position at the Assistant Secretary level, responsible for IT and security.

They also are looking at training (too basic) and discipline (can cyber-mistakes get you fired).

There is a report due June 1 outlining the roles, responsibilities and staffing for a Assistant secretary for cyber with a plan to role it out in July.  March.  June.  July.  This is amazingly fast for an organization as large as the Navy.

WHAT ARE THE OTHER SERVICES DOING?  Source: Defense Systems.

 

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Security News Bites for Week Ending August 17, 2018

Hamas Creates Fake Missile Warning App to Hack Israelis

The Times of Israel is reporting that Hamas has created and was distributing a fake Code Red rocket warning app.

The app, according to Clearsky Cyber Security, takes over the phone and is impossible to remove, even if the app is deleted.

Once infected, the app allows the hacker to track the phone, take pictures, record sound, make calls and send messages – everything a normal user would do, except the person doing it, in this case, is a terrorist.

The message here is not just to avoid Hamas, but also to be wary of apps from untrusted sources as they may have unintended side effects.  Source: The Times of Israel.

Cisco and Others Release Patches for VPN Encryption Flaws

Cisco, Huawei, Clavister and ZyXEL network products are susceptible to an attack according to a paper to be presented at the Usenix Security Symposium.  This would allow an attacker to recover the encryption nonce which then would allow an attacker to decrypt all VPN data.

Note this is NOT a flaw in the encryption algorithm, but rather a bug in the software that implements it.  This is why people regularly successfully hack and steal millions in crypto currency – because no software is perfect.

It is interesting that Cisco is the only major player affected.

Cisco has released patches for IOS and IOS XE, but users can only get them if they pay Cisco for software maintenance, the main reason I do not recommend Cisco products.  The other vendors don’t charge users for fixes of security flaws.

For Cisco users that do not have maintenance or are running old, unsupported hardware, *IF* you have the ability to turn off rsa-encr authentication mode, that will solve the problem.  It may break other things, however.  Source: Bleeping Computer.

Oracle Releases Critical Security Patch

Oracle is urging its customers to quickly patch a critical vulnerability in their database installations which can result in a complete compromise of the database and provide shell access to the underlying server.

The attack only affects Oracle versions 11.2 and 12.2, is easy to exploit, can be exploited remotely but does require the attacker to have credentials.  The vulnerability is in the Java virtual machine.

Users running 12.1 on Windows or any version of Linux or Unix should install the July patches.  Source: Helpnet Security.

Yet Another Spectre/Meltdown Style Vulnerability Found

This is a strange security week between Oracle and Cisco.  Now we have news of yet another Spectre/Meltdown style vulnerability.  How is it that for 15 years no one found any of them and this year they have found at least 6, probably more?

This new bug affects the Intel Core- and Xeon families, i.e. the chip in every PC and Mac.  It is called the L1 Terminal Fault.  This new fault affects Intel’s SGX, which is kind of like the iPhone’s secure enclave, allowing an attacker to extract information from it – not good.

To add insult to injury, while the researchers found one attack, which Intel has confirmed, Intel itself says it found two more attacks.

Now here is the bad news.  Intel says that they will have a patch which will eliminate the problem with no performance impact on end user and non- virtualized environments, but for users running in a virtualized environment, especially in the cloud, that is a different story and Intel says that you will have to take additional steps – steps that you probably cannot actually take in a shared host environment like many AWS, Azure or Google environments. Source: Computing.Co .

Bitcoin Speculator Sues AT&T for $240 Million

The speculator is suing AT&T after they allowed a social engineer to port his phone number which he used for two factor authentication for his bitcoin transactions.

A hacker had broken into his account a few months earlier and AT&T had set up an account PIN (this should be standard) and flagged his account as high risk.  None the less, an employee allowed a hacker to port the phone number anyway, without any of that information.

Porting phone numbers to get around two factor authentication is becoming popular;  I was interviewed for a TV piece recently where someone’s number was ported and their bank account emptied out in just a few minutes.

AT&T is fighting the suit saying that they are not required to follow their own security protocols and certainly not responsible for what happens if they do not.  The speculator lost $23+ million in bitcoin.

For those who are in a high risk situation, using text messages for two factor is not sufficient and, in fact, given his account was hacked before, why didn’t HE change to a more secure second factor immediately weakens his case.

Stay tuned.  Source: The Register .

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