Tag Archives: Moodys

Security News for the Week Ending May 31, 2019

Baltimore Ransomware Attack Could Be Blamed on the NSA

I think this is what they call a tease.

Technically correct, however.

You may remember the NSA hacking tool that got out into the wild called EternalBlue?  It was leaked by the hacking group ShadowBrokers in 2017.  Before that, it exploited a Microsoft  bug that the NSA decided was  too juicy to tell Microsoft to fix – for five years.  Then it got out.  Now North Korea, China, Russia and others are using it.

So who’s fault is it?  Should the government tell vendors to fix bugs or should they risk not telling them and having a Baltimore or WannaCry which destroyed the British Healthcare system or NotPetya or many others.

Certainly you could blame ShadowBrokers, but as we have seen with other malware, as soon as you use it, you run the risk of it being detected and used against you.

In this case, I blame Baltimore because Microsoft patched the flaw in March 2017 and apparently, it is not deployed in Baltimore.

Three weeks and counting, Baltimore is still trying to undo the damage.  For lack of a patch.  To be fair, it might have happened anyway.  But it would not have spread like wildfire.   Source:  NY Times.

First. Time. Ever! – Moody’s Downgrades Equifax Due to Breach

Turnabout *IS* fair.

For the first time ever, Equifax is discovering what they do to others all the time when they downgrade consumer’s credit scores.

In this case, it is Moody’s that is downgrading Equifax’s score.

Moody’s downgraded Equifax from STABLE to NEGATIVE.

Likely because they just announced that they have spent $1.35 Billion fixing the breach damage and none of the lawsuits are settled yet.  This is likely to be the costliest breach ever.  Source: CNBC.

 

Cisco Warns Thangrycat Fix May Destroy Your Hardware

More information has come out about the Cisco Trust Anchor vulnerability called Thrangrycat.  The trust anchor is the root of all security in Cisco devices and if it gets compromised, then there is no security in the device at all.

The good news is that the hackers who found it said it was hard to find, BUT, now that the hackers know what to look for, expect an attack kit to show up for a few bucks on the dark web.

The problem is that Cisco has to reprogram a piece of hardware inside all of those switches, routers and firewalls.  THAT MUST BE DONE ONSITE.  Worse yet, there is a possibility that the reprogramming could turn your firewall into a really expensive brick.

Cisco says that if your device is under warranty or if you have a maintenance contract and they brick your device, they will mail you a new one.  The device will be down until you get the new one.

I am sure they will try hard not to brick things, but reprogramming FPGAs on the fly – its not simple and things could go wrong.

IF, however, you do not have a warranty or maintenance contract and the device gets bricked, you are on your own.

For those people, now might be the time to replace that Cisco gear with someone else’s.  That won’t be perfect either, however.  Source: Techtarget.

 

New Zealand Cryptocurrency Firm Hacked To Death

As I keep pointing out, “investing” in cryptocurrency is much like gambling with no insurance and no hedge.

In this case Cryptopia , a New Zealand based cyptocurrency exchange is filing for bankruptcy and still has millions in digital assets that belong to its customers.

But maybe not for long because their IT provider says that they owe millions and is threatening to take down the servers that contain the digital assets.  In the meantime, customers wait.  Source: Bloomberg.

 

Flipboard Says Hackers Were Roaming Inside For NINE Months Before Being Detected

Flipboard admitted that hackers were inside their systems from nine months between June 2018 and March 2019 and then again in April 2019, when they were detected.

Flipboard says that user passwords, which were salted and strongly hashed, were taken.  What they didn’t say, because they are not forced to by law, was what else was taken.  According to the security firm Crowdstrike, the best hackers move laterally from the system in which they entered, in 18 minutes.  The average hackers take 10 hours.  Where did they move in nine months?

If they want me to believe that nothing else was taken, they must think I am a fool.  I am not.  But the law doesn’t require them to tell you what else was taken.

Since they are not publicly traded, they don’t have to tell the SEC what else was taken.  In fact, they only have to tell the SEC if it materially affects the company – a term which is conveniently not defined.  Source: ZDNet.

Turnabout – Part Two

While President Trump shouts about Huawei spying for the Chinese, the Chinese are removing all Windows systems from their military environment due to fear of hacking by the US.   While this won’t have any significant financial impact on Microsoft, it is kind of a poke in their eye.

For some strange reason, they are not going to use Linux, but rather develop their own OS.  One reason might be that a unknown proprietary OS that only the Chinese military has the source code for would be harder to hack by the US than any other OS.  Source: ZDNet.

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News Bites for the Week Ending November 30, 2018

Microsoft Azure and O.365 Multi-Factor Authentication Outage

Microsoft’s cloud environment had an outage this week for the better part of a day, worldwide.  The failure stopped users who had turned on two factor authentication from logging in.

This is not a “gee, Microsoft is bad” or “gee, two factor authentication is bad” problem.  All systems have failures, especially the ones that businesses run internally.  Unfortunately cloud systems fail occasionally too.

The bigger question is are you prepared for that guaranteed, some time in the future, failure?

It is a really bad idea to assume cloud systems will not fail, whether they are from a particular industry specific application or a generic one like Microsoft or Google.

What is your acceptable length for an outage?  How much data are you willing to lose?

More importantly, do you have a plan for what to do in case you pass those points of no return and have you recently tested those plans?

Failures usually happen when it is inconvenient and planning is critical to dealing with it.  Dealing with an outage absent a well thought out and tested plan is likely to be a disaster. Source: ZDNet.

 

Moody’s is Going to Start Including Cyber Risk in Credit Ratings

We have said for a long time that cyber risk is a business problem.  Business credit ratings represent the overall risk a business represents.

What has been missing is connecting the two.

Now Moody’s is going to do that.

While details are scarce, Moody’s says that they will soon evaluate organizations risk from a cyber attack.

Moody’s has even created a new cyber risk group.

While they haven’t said so yet, likely candidates for initial scrutiny of cyber risk are defense contractors, financial, health care and critical infrastructure.

For companies that care about their risk ratings, make sure that your cybersecurity is in order along with your finances.  Source: CNBC.

 

British Lawmakers Seize Facebook Files

In what has got to be an interesting game, full of innuendo and intrigue, British lawmakers seized documents sealed by a U.S. court when the CEO of a company that had access to them visited England.

The short version of the back story is that the Brits are not real happy with Facebook and were looking for copies of documents that had been part of discovery in a lawsuit between app maker Six4Three and Facebook that has been going on for years.

So, when Ted Kramer, founder of the company visited England on business, the Parliament’s Sargent-at-arms literally hauled Ted into Parliament and threatened to throw him in jail if he did not produce the documents sealed by the U.S. court.

So Ted is between a rock and a hard place;  the Brits have physical custody of him;  the U.S. courts could hold him in contempt (I suspect they will huff and puff a lot, but not do anything) – so he turns over the documents.

Facebook has been trying to hide these documents for years.  I suspect that Six4Three would be happy if they became public.  Facebook said, after the fact, that the Brits should return the documents.  The Brits said go stick it.  You get the idea.

Did Six4Three play a part in this drama in hopes of getting these emails released?  Don’t know but I would not rule that out.  Source: CNBC.

 

Two More Hospitals Hit By Ransomware

The East Ohio Regional Hospital (EORH) and Ohio Valley Medical Center (OVMC) were both hit by a ransomware attack.  The hospitals reverted to using paper patient charts and are sending ambulances to other hospitals.  Of course they are saying that patient care isn’t affected, but given you have no information available to you regarding patients currently in the hospital, their diagnoses, tests or prior treatments, that seems a bit optimistic.

While most of us do not deal with life and death situations, it can take a while – weeks or longer – to recover from ransomware attacks if the organization is not prepared.

Are you prepared?  In this case, likely one doctor or nurse clicked on the wrong link;  that is all it takes.  Source: EHR Intelligence.

 

Atrium Health Data Breach – Over 2 Million Customers Impacted

Atrium Health announced a breach of the personal information of over 2 million customers including Socials for about 700,000 of them.

However, while Atrium gets to pay the fine, it was actually the fault of one of their vendors, Accudoc.  Accudoc does billing for them for their 44 hospitals.

Atrium says that the data was accessed but not downloaded and did not include credit card data.  Of course if the bad guys “accessed” the data and then screen scraped it, it would not show as downloaded.

One more time – VENDOR CYBER RISK MANAGEMENT.  It has to be a priority.   Unless you don’t mind taking the rap and fines for your vendor’s errors.   Source: Charlotte Observer.

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