Tag Archives: NSA

Security News for the Week Ending June 4, 2021

Freaking Ooops: Us Nuke Bunker Security Secrets On Public ‘Net Since 2013

Details of some US nuclear missile bunkers in Europe, including secret duress codewords have been exposed publicly on the Internet. Journalists discovered it by using simple search queries. The information was on training flashcards, which should not have been public. It includes “intricate security details and protocols such as the positions of cameras, the frequency of patrols around the vaults, secret duress words that signal when a guard is being threatened and the identifiers that a restricted area badge needs to have”. The information has now been deleted. It was exposed since 2013. Good job, folks! Credit: The Register

If You Can’t Spy Yourself, Ask Your Friends for Help

It takes a village – even if that is a village of Spies. The NSA got help from Denmark in spying on top politicians and other high ranking officials in Germany, Sweden, Norway and France. They did this by asking the Danes to let them tap into an underwater fiber optic cable in 2012. Targets include Angela Merkel. Generally, politicians cyber hygiene habits are really poor, so the NSA probably found a lot of unencrypted data. Credit: The Hacker News

Watch Your Words When Discussing Breaches

If your company is in the unfortunate situation of dealing with a cyber breach, the lawyers say watch what you say in emails or Slack or similar channels because it can come back to bite the company later. If you say to a coworker “oh, yeah, we knew about that bug for months” and the bug wasn’t fixed and that contributed to the breach, well, you can see, that could be a problem for the company. Obviously, it goes without saying that social media is definitely off limits for that kind of conversation. Unless, you don’t like your job or the company. Read details in SC Magazine.

ARIN Plans to Take Down Part of the Internet – This is Just a Test

ARIN, the American Internet IP authority, plans to take down the RPKI infrastructure some time in July, without notice, just to see what breaks. In theory, if RPKI is implemented correctly, the fact that this goes down should be a big yawn. We shall see. Credit: Bleeping Computer

FBI and DoJ to Treat Ransomware Like Terrorism

Since ransomware *IS* terrorism, it is nice to hear that the DoJ is going to treat it as such. Unlike the last administration, this time the FBI took direct aim at Russia as the culprit in a lot of the ransomware attacks. The US Attorney’s offices in every state have been directed to investigate ransomware attacks the same way that they treat other forms of terrorism. While they don’t have the resources to investigate every ransomware attack, any big attack or one that hits a critical industry will be handled just like a terrorist bombing. While this won’t fix the problem, more attention is good. Credit: ZDNet

NSA/FBI/CISA Issue Alert – Russia SVR

While China is a serious threat and the last administration pushed on that hard, that administration ignored Russia.

Today the National Security Agency, the FBI and the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agencies issued a joint alert titled Russian SVR Targets U.S. and Allied Networks.

The NSA, FBI and CISA said that the Russian Foreign Intelligence Service or SVR is behind the exploitation of 5 publicly known vulnerabilities.

The Feds also announced that Russia and the SVR were the ones behind the SolarWinds attack and all the other attacks surrounding SolarWinds.

In addition to the SolarWinds attack, they are crediting/blaming Russia for:

  • Fortinet Fortigate VPN
  • Synacor Zimbra Collaboration Suite
  • Pulse VPN
  • Citrix Application Delivery Gateway
  • VMWare Workspace ONE Access

The advisory is available here.

The FBI and their cousins also provided some very specific actions to take, here.

Here is the problem. These actors are pros. These are not random attacks.

In the SolarWinds attack they went after heavily defended federal agencies as well as a lot of big companies.

The Feds are saying that you should assume a breach will happen. Note that they did not say assume a breach might happen.

They said to implement network segmentation.

Enable robust logging

Prepare for incident response.

It seems like they are saying that we are fighting a war.

The feds will do their part to try and identify them and slow them down, but this is more of an art than a science.

One bit of good news is that the NSA is sufficiently embarrassed for missing SolarWinds that they are on high alert. That should help. HELP, but not prevent.

Historically, the NSA spent 90% of their budget on offense and 10% on defense. While we don’t know what those numbers are today, the pendulum has definitely moved.

And this is good for every business in America.

Be prepared. Credit: NSA

Security News for the Week Ending March 26, 2021

China Bans Military and Government from using Teslas – Due to ‘Spying’

The WSJ is reporting that the Chinese government has restricted the use of Tesla vehicles near or in sensitive installations like military and government facilities. The theory is that the cameras on Teslas could be used for spying. Tesla, of course, denies that they are spies, but consider this. What is to stop hackers or state intelligence agencies from hacking ANY self driving car and stealing the data. I am sure that Musk would say that his security is great, but is it perfect? This is not a Tesla problem, this is a ’20 cameras on 4 wheels with an Internet connection’ problem and this case, I would say the Chinese are correct. The problem is that with more and more self driving cars, do you ban all cars from sensitive places? What if you convince the owner to sell their data after driving around a sensitive facility? If someone offered you $50,000 to rent your car for a week, no questions asked, would you take it? Oh, yeah, it might back with less data than it went out with. Credit: ZDNet

Facebook Fails to Derail $15 billion Privacy Lawsuit

Facebook is being accused of violating wiretap laws because of the way the Facebook “Like” icons work to track even people who do not have Facebook accounts, never mind ones who do have an account but are not logged in. Of course, Facebook monetizes this data in a variety of ways. Facebook told the Supreme Court that if they allowed the California federal court decision to let the case proceed (which is different than saying the plaintiffs will win), that would have detrimental consequences. While $15 billion is a lot of money, remember that Facebook made $30 billion in PROFIT just last year and allowing the case to proceed, does not mean anyone will win or what the penalty might be. Surely if Facebook loses it will be detrimental – to them, but that is never been a reason to stop a lawsuit from moving forward. Credit: Security Week

Amazon Contractors Have to Sign a Biometric Consent Form or Lose Their Job

Amazon continues to ratchet down on their contract drivers (and probably their own too). They are installing AI based cameras in their delivery vehicles that watch both the road and the drivers. If a driver yawns, they see that. If the driver looks at his or her phone, they see that too. Not wearing your seatbelt? Problem. Too many negatives and they are history. Or, they can quit now. Oh, yeah, they can keep the data forever. Credit: Vice

Hackers Demand $50 Million Ransom from Acer – Threaten to Leak Data

In what is probably the largest ransom demand ever (at least that we know of), hackers encrypted systems at Acer on March 14th and demanded a $50 million ransom. The hackers posted on the dark web that negotiations had broken down. Acer, apparently, offered $10 million, but Acer is not confirming anything. Leaked documents are less sensitive financial info, so we don’t really know what they have. The compromise may have started with the Microsoft Exchange Server hack. The main risk factor here, likely, is the disclosure of whatever the hackers stole. Stay tuned. Credit: Hackread

After NSA Head Says NSA Missed SolarWinds Because it Can’t Spy in US, Administration Says It Does Not Plan to Increase US Surveillance

An administration official, earlier this month, said that the administration, worried about the political blowback of the NSA spying on Americans, was not CURRENTLY seeking additional laws to allow the NSA (or others) to do additional spying on Americans. Instead, they want to focus on tighter partnerships with the private sector and allow them to provide the data to the feds. This would give the feds a cover story that they are just using data that has already been collected. This is my de-spinning of what they said. Credit: Security Week

Security News for the Week Ending February 26, 2021

DoD Working on CMMC-Fedramp ‘Reciprocity’ by Year End

CMMC, the DoD’s new cybersecurity standard is designed to measure security practices of companies and the servers in the computer rooms and data centers. But what about the stuff in the cloud. That is covered by another government standard called FedRAMP. But those two standards have different rules and contractors who have both need to figure out how to comply with two competing standards. DoD is working on this and plans to have a solution by September. One challenge is that FedRAMP allows for a ‘To-Do’ list – stuff we will fix when we get to it and CMMC does not. Harmonizing these two standards is critical for defense contractors. Credit: Defense Systems

The Risk of NSA’s Offensive Security Strategy

The NSA has, for decades, favored offensive security (hacking others) over defensive security (protecting us). The Obama administration created a process called the vulnerabilities equities process to try and rationalize keeping bugs secret to use against others vs. telling vendors so that they could fix them. Check Point research published a report talking about one failure where the Chinese figured out the bug we were using, one way or another and used it against us. That is the danger of offensive security. Read the details here. Credit: The Register

HINT: When Your Vendor Tells You it is Time to Upgrade – Listen

Airplane maker Bombardier is the latest entry into the club of companies who were compromised with Accellion’s decades old FTA file transfer system. What was likely stolen was intellectual property. Accellion has been trying to get customers off this decades old platform for 5 years. Now they say they are going to formally end-of-life the old software in April. 300 customers did not listen. At least 100 were compromised. Credit: ZDNet

Microsoft Asks Congress to Force Companies to Disclose Breaches

Microsoft’s president Brad Smith testified at a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing this week about the SolarWinds breach. Smith said that the private sectors should be legally obligated to disclose any major hacks. None of the other CEOs who testified argued with Smith. The details of who, how, when, etc. are note easy to figure out as is the penalty for breaking the law. I suspect that the overwhelming majority of breaches are never reported to anyone because there is no incentive to do so. Credit: The Register

DHS-CISA Reveals Authentication Bypass of Rockwell Factory Controllers

Rockwell industrial automation controllers used in places like factory floors can be compromised by a remote hacker if they can install some malware on the network. The bug has a severity score of 10 out of 10. The compromise would allow hackers to upload firmware of their choosing and download data from the controller. The bug was initially disclosed to Rockwell in 2019. Credit: Security Week

Security News for the Week Ending September 4, 2020

Centurylink Routing Issues Lead to Massive Internet Outage

Last Saturday night/Sunday morning, Centurylink had a bit of a problem, either taking down or severely impacting web site such as Cloudflare, Amazon, Steam, Twitter and many more. Just because a system was designed to stay operating in case of a nuclear attack does not mean that it is immune to human error or software bugs. Centurylink has not explained what happened. This particular attack nullified many business continuity strategies. If staying online is important to you, this would be a good time to review your DR-BC program. Credit: Bleeping Computer

The New Normal: Dell Says 60% of Their Staff Will Not be Going Back to the Office Regularly

We are seeing more companies saying that they do not plan to return to office life ever. Dell says that the majority of it’s 165,000 member workforce will never return to the office again or regularly. Dell says “work is something you do, an outcome, not a place or time”.

Ignore for the moment what this means for the commercial real estate market if this becomes the new normal.

That means a significant leap for your cybersecurity practices going forward. When the majority of your work is being done on a network, via unencrypted wireless through a router that was last patched in 2013, what does that mean for security? If that thought keeps you up at night, call us. Credit: The Register

Users’ Browsing Can Be De-Anonymized With Little Work, Researchers Say

Mozilla (Firefox) collected two 1-week browsing history datasets from 50,000 volunteers and were able to re-identify anonymous browsing data to the individual successfully. With users who only visited 50 web sites during that period, they were able to re-identify up to 80% of them. The odds improve when the researchers have more data. After all, who visits only 50 web sites in a two week period. Therefore, assume claims of data being anonymized with great skepticism. Credit: Help Net Security

US Federal Appeals Court Rules NSA’s Mass Surveillance Disclosed by Edward Snowden is Illegal

Seven years after Edward Snowden disclosed the existence of NSA’s mass surveillance program a federal appeals court said the program is illegal. In defending the program, the NSA pointed to one case where NSA surveillance data was used, but the judge overseeing that case says that the NSA’s information was not material. However, the same court said that the folks convicted in that case are still guilty so no getting off the hook based on that. Given the hundreds of millions of dollars spent on this program, the fact that the NSA can only point to one court case where the program had any effect should kill the program on effectiveness grounds anyway, but that it not the job of the court. I am sure the Republican administration will appeal this up to the Supremes, but they may or may not take the case, so stay tuned. Credit: Threatpost

Republican Plan to Ban Huawei Will Cost Americans $2 Billion

Now that the Republicans have decided (it is an election year) that Huawei is a national security threat (but wasn’t for the last three years), they have created a requirement to rip out and replace all of the existing Huawei (and ZTE) equipment that carriers are already using. The first step in this process was to ask the carriers well, how much will it cost to replace all that stuff. The carriers have come back with that initial estimate and it is $1.8 billion and change. Carriers are notoriously bad at estimating costs like this, so make it $2.5 billion or so.

BTW, I am not saying that the FCC is wrong, I just don’t understand why this wasn’t considered a problem in 2017 vs. two months before the elections.

Where is that money going to come from? There are really only two options – higher prices to customers and a taxpayer subsidy.

Curiously, the Republicans are complaining about a Chinese law that requires Chinese companies to comply with requests from the intelligence services and not tell anyone. If I was wearing a blindfold, that would sound exactly like the U.S. Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act or FISA.

I have said for a long time that when it comes to telecom, the U.S. is basically a third world country (according to Wikipedia, we rank 30th in the world for mobile Internet connection speed). What the carriers will do in the short term is, except for really densely populated downtown cities, slow down the rollout of 5G Internet (Verizon, for example, only covers 5% of the population with high speed 5G – high speed means that a user can tell the difference when connecting over a 5G connection vs. connecting over a 4G connection). Other carriers cover more of the US, but with virtually no speed difference over 4G, but now, even that rollout will likely slow down.

Security News Bites for the Week Ending July 28, 2017

Zip Slip Vulnerability Affects Thousands of Projects

Researchers discovered a flaw in almost all zip-style file decompressors – RAR, TAR, 7ZIP-APK and others.

The problem is caused by a very old attack vector called directory traversal that these libraries do not handle correctly.

The decompressor libraries were likely downloaded from places like Github and Stack Overflow and developers used them in thousands of projects used by millions of users without a clue that the vulnerability has existed for years, maybe decades.

And, likely, most of those developers are completely blind to the fact their their software  is vulnerable due to a software supply chain issue – assuming they are even still involved with those software projects.

Software supply chain is the Achilles heel of the entire industry and the industry is not doing much to fix it.  (Source: Bleeping Computer)

NSA Forms Group to Counter Russian Threat in Cyberspace

In what would appear to be a difference of opinion with his boss, the head of the NSA has created a special task force to address Russian threats in cyberspace.  The Washington Post reported that the NSA and its sister Cybercom will collaborate against Russian threats to the security of the U.S. midterm elections – a threat which his boss, the President, has said does not exist any more, if it ever did.  The President has called the threat fake news many times.  It would appear that General Nakasone has a difference of opinion with his boss.  Source: Bloomberg

Level One Robotics Leaves Tens of Thousand of Sensitive Docs Unprotected

Canadian robotics vendor Level One is the most recent vendor to leave tens of thousands of sensitive documents – apparently including non disclosure agreements – belonging to multiple automakers including Tesla, Toyota and Volkswagen – unprotected online.  The material includes documents from over 100 companies and includes blueprints, factory schematics and other materials.

The data was found by Chris Vickery of Upgard.  Chris has found dozens of unprotected data sets just in recent months, usually on Amazon.  Chris DOES NO HACKING.  All he does is walk around the digital neighborhood jiggling doorknobs, looking for ones that are unlocked.  In this case, the material was an unprotected backup – 157 gigabytes of data made up of over 47,000 files. If hackers found it before Chris did, and they may have, they are likely celebrating.  That quantity of data on the design of cars and car assembly could give them a significant advantage in hacking into automobiles from a wide range of companies.  Source: NY Times

Federal Officials Tell WSJ That Ruskies Have Already Hacked the US Power Grid

The Department of Homeland Security reported Monday that hackers, working for Russia, hacked into the US power grid as early as 2013 and are likely still inside the grid with the ability to turn off the lights.  DHS says there were likely  hundreds of victims and one of the attack vectors is by compromising trusted vendors of the power companies (third party vendor cyber risk management).  Homeland Security said that some of the power companies don’t know that they have been hacked (why not – don’t their telephones work?).  Maybe that will be a topic of discussion when Putin visits President Trump in the White House this fall.  For all businesses, if you do not have an aggressive vendor cyber risk management program already, now is the time.  Source: CNET

Russian Hackers Attack Senator Claire McCaskill

Reports have surfaced today that Russian intelligence agency GRU attacked the re-election campaign of Senator Claire McCaskill of Missouri.  The Senator says that the attack was not successful.  McCaskill is a vocal opponent of Russia.  This is happening as the President continues to say that Russia is not hacking us and before the campaign season really warms up.  Source: The Daily Beast