Tag Archives: SalesForce

Security News for the Week Ending February 12, 2021

Law Firm Goodwin Procter Hacked

Goodwin Procter managing parnter Mark Bettencourt confirmed that some of their clients’ data was compromised. But not to worry; it only affected a small percentage of their clients. One more time, we have a “supply chain attack”. While the vendor was unnamed, I suspect it was Accellion. They suffered a breach that is all over the news due to the high profile targets that suffered a loss. So now a very high profile law firm has to explain to its clients why its security was not good enough to protect their most sensitive data. If you are a client of a law firm, how confident are you that they can protect your data? Credit: ABA Journal

What Does This Mean for Cities?

Salesforce is joining other big tech companies in changing the work-life equation. This week they announced that most staff, after Covid, will only be in the office 1-3 days a week, many workers will never return to the office and a few workers will be in the office 4-5 days a week. This means that work from home security is now permanent, but it also questions the implications for downtown big cities. Salesforce has 9,000 workers in San Francisco. If half of them never come to the office and another 30% come to the office 1-2 days a week, what does this mean for downtown retail and office space? Credit: MSN

State Department Declassifies Report on Cuba’s Sonic Weapon

You may remember reports of Cuba having a secret sonic weapon back in 2017-2018. A newly declassified report by the State Department’s own Accountability Review Board lambasted the department’s response to the attack as lacking leadership, having ineffective communication and being systemically disorganized. There are 104 pages of detail, but none of them paint the previous administration favorably. As a result of the botched investigation we will probably never understand what the weapon was that Cuba attacked us with. Credit: Vice

Ex-Students Plead Guilty to Stealing and Trading Nude Pics and Vids

Two former SUNY Plattsburgh (NY) students pleaded guilty to hacking coeds’ MyPlattsurgh portal accounts and stealing nude pictures and videos. The portal contains full access to the students’ email, cloud storage, college billing, financial aid, coursework, grades and other personal information. They either guessed passwords or guessed security question answers. When the found nude photos and videos, they traded them with others, in some cases identifying the students by name. They even posted some photos online. Credit: The Register

IRS Warns Tax Pros of Identity Thieves Targeting Them

The IRS is warning tax professionals hackers are trying to steal their electronic tax filing credentials so that they can file fake returns and those returns will be tied to those same tax pros. If you are a tax pro and need help, please contact us. Credit: Bleeping Computer

Security news for the Week Ending May 24, 2019

SalesForce Gives Users Access To All of Your Company’s Data

In what can only be called an Oops, SalesForce deployed a script last Friday that gave users of certain parts of SalesForce access to all of the data that a company had on the system.  The good news is that it didn’t show you anyone else’s data,  but it did give users both read and write access to all of their company’s data.

In order to fix it, Salesforce took down large parts of its environment, causing some companies that depend on SalesForce to shut their company down and send employees home.

This brings up the issue of disaster recovery and business continuity.  Just because it is in the cloud does not mean that you won’t have a disaster.  It is not clear if replicating your SalesForce app to another data center would have kept these companies working.  Source: ZDNet.

Google Tracks Your Online Purchases Through GMail

While this is probably not going to show up as a surprise, Google scans your emails to find receipts from online purchases and stores them in your Google purchase history at https://myaccount.google.com/purchases .  This is true whether you use Google Pay or not.  One user reported that Google tracked their Dominos Pizza and 1-800-Flowers purchases, as well as Amazon, among other stores.

You can delete this history if have masochistic tendencies, but I doubt anyone is going to do that because it requires you to delete the underlying email that caused it to populate the purchase, one by one.  There is also no way to turn this “Feature” off.

It appears that it keeps this data forever.

Google said they are not using this data to serve ads, but they did not respond to the question about if they use it for other purposes.  Source: Bleeping Computer.

President Trump Building An Email List to Bypass Social Media

Welcome to the world of big data.  The Prez has created a survey for people to submit information about how they have been wronged by social media.  And get you subscribed to his email list.  Nothing illegal.  Nothing nefarious.  Just a big data grab.

If you read the user agreement, it says you “grant the U.S. Government a license to use, edit, display, publish, broadcast, transmit, post, or otherwise distribute all or part of the Content.  (NOTE: That “content” includes your email address and phone number).  The license you grant is irrevocable and valid in perpetuity, throughout the world, and in all forms of media.” 

This seems to be hosted on the Whitehouse.Gov servers.  It is not clear who will have access to this data or for what purpose.  Source: Vice.

Colorado Governor Declares Statewide Emergency After Ransomware Attack

Last year the Colorado Department of Transportation suffered a ransomware attack.  Initially the state thought it was getting a handle on the attack, but ten days later it came back.

It was the first time any state had issued a Statewide Emergency for a cyberattack.  Ever!  Anywhere!

It had the affect that the state was able to mobilize the National Guard, call in resources from other departments, activate the state Department of Homeland Security and Emergency Management and get help from the FBI and the US Department of Homeland Security.  It also allowed them to call for “Mutual Aid”, the process where neighboring jurisdictions  – in this case neighboring states – provided assistance.

It worked and since then, other states have begun to do this.

When you have a disaster, even a cyber disaster, you need a lot of resources and an emergency declaration is one way to do it. Source: StateScoop.

 

Latest Breach – 885 Million Records

First American Financial, one of the largest title insurance companies, exposed 885 million records going back to 2003 due to a software design flaw.  The records include all kinds of sensitive records that are associated with real estate closings.  Source:  Krebs on Security.