Tag Archives: Saudis

Security News for the Week Ending January 24, 2020

Breaches Gone Wild – Very Wild

Since EU’s GDPR went into effect on May 25, 2018 – about 18 months ago – 160,000 Breaches have been reported to EU authorities.  A calculator will tell you that means that people are reporting between 250 and 300 security incidents A DAY!

If you think that magically, 18 months ago, the number of breaches that were occurring skyrocketed – well that is not likely.  At least one of the data protection authorities says that there is over-reporting, but that two thirds of the reports are legitimate.

So far companies have PAID about $125 million in fines and the largest single fine was about $55 million.  Expect many more fines in the future since the authorities have not processed most of those 160,000 reports.  Source: ZDNet

Hacker Posts 500,000 Userid/Password Combinations

A hacker who is changing his business model posted the userids, passwords and IP addresses of 515,000 servers, routers and IoT devices on the Internet.  The hacker had used the compromised devices to attack other computers in Distributed Denial of Service attacks.

But he has decided to change his business model and instead use powerful servers in data centers to attack his victims, so he didn’t need all of these devices any more.

What is not clear is why he published the list.  He certainly could have sold it.  Maybe he thought that if the list became public people who change their passwords from the default or easy to guess ones that they were using.  Source: ZDNet

 

New York State Want to Ban Government Agencies From Paying Ransoms

Two NY Senators, a Republican and a Democrat, have each introduced bills that would outlaw using taxpayer money to pay ransoms.  One of the bills includes language to create a fund to help local municipalities improve their security.  Given the number of attacks on government networks, this would cause some tension.  If a city could pay a ransom and get operational in a few days vs. if they didn’t have good backups, it could take months to recover.  Stay tuned.  Source: ZDNet

 

U.N. Report: Bezos Hacked By Saudi Prince MBS

While some people are questioning the report by U.N. experts that Amazon and Washington Post CEO Jeff Bezos phone was hacked by Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed Ben Salman.  The report says that the hacking can be tied directly to a Whatsapp message sent from MBS’s phone.  Give other things MBS is accused of doing, this is certainly possible.  While the Saudis, not surprisingly, called the report absurd, others are calling for an investigation.  Source: The Register

News Bites for the Week Ending October 26, 2018

Poorly Secured Family of Adult Web Sites Leak Account Info

For those people who can think back to the hack of the Ashley Madison web site, this is kind of deja vu all over again.

100 megabytes of user authentication data was leaked – user names, IP addresses, passwords and email addresses.  Not THE most sensitive data, but most people who visit adult web sites do not advertise that fact.  But there is more.

One surprise is that there were OVER ONE MILLION email addresses compromised.

Along with, apparently, pictures that some people uploaded to some of the sites.  Suffice it to say those pictures are not of sunsets over the beach.

The owner of the 8 sites took the sites down almost immediately and told people to change their passwords.

One disappointing feature of the sites – the passwords, while encrypted (or technically hashed), were encrypted with a hashing algorithm over 40 years old and which can be easily decrypted.

All this does point out the dangers of posting data and pictures to the web – YOU don’t understand what their security practices are like.  It also points out that web site owners need to get a security review of their web site from time to time to make sure that they re not using 40 year old unsecure algorithms.  Source: Ars Technica.

 

Saudis “buy” Twitter Employee to Spy on Dissidents

The Saudis do not need any more bad news, but they are getting it anyway.  The Times has reported that the Saudis “groomed” (maybe bribed or blackmailed) a Twitter employee to feed them dirt on Saudi dissidents.  In addition, the Saudis, like the Russians, have mounted a huge disinformation campaign.  Social media has a huge challenge and no easy answers.  Source: The Hill .

 

NY Times Reports US Begins First LIMITED Cyber Ops Against Russia

In spite of the fact that President Trump says that the Russians are not hacking our elections, the United States Cyber Command is targeting Russians to stop them from interfering with the elections.  The campaign started in recent days.

The campaign comes after the Justice Department released a report last Friday outlining a Russian campaign of information warfare.

Not surprisingly, the Pentagon is not talking much about this – just like they would not talk about any spy activities or activities that would likely be considered illegal, aggressive or an act of war by the targeted countries.

Interestingly, the story says that the actions are “measured” and much less that what the Russians are doing.  Why?  Because they are worried that Russia might take down the US power grid or some other major cyber activity.

That is not comforting.  Source: NY Times .

 

UK Grocer Morrisons Loses Appeal of Breach Class Action

This is the UK and not the US, but still, this is interesting.  A disgruntled employee downloaded data on 100,000 employees, leaked it to the press and posted it online.  Data leaked include salary and bank account information.

Morrisons was sued not surprisingly but, somewhat surprisingly, lost.  Morrisons appealed the court verdict, but lost the appeal.  They now plan to appeal to the UK Supreme Court.

If they lose there, it will mark a turning point in security law.  The company maintains that they did nothing wrong and it was a rogue employee who leaked the data.  The employee is now in jail.  The court says Morrisons is responsible anyway.  Stay tuned because if the courts hold that companies are responsible for the unauthorized actions of their employees, boy oh boy.  Source: BBC .

Yahoo Settles One More Lawsuit for $50 Mil Plus Credit Monitoring for 200 Million

As Yahoo continues to feel the fallout from its data breaches in 2013-2014 that it failed to disclose, they agreed to another settlement covering 1 billion of the 3 billion users affected.

For this suit, they will pay $50 million, split between Verizon and Altaba (the company that controls what is level of Yahoo) and provide credit monitoring for 200 million people for 2 years.  Add to that $35 million in legal fees.

This, of course, is not the end.  It is only one lawsuit of many plus fines from regulators. Stay tuned for further settlements. This really poorly planned strategy of Marissa Mayer to hide the breach may wind up costing Yahoo and Verizon a billion dollars.  Source: Seattle Pi.

Score One For the Right to Repair Movement

Every three years the Librarian of Congress gets to arbitrarily decide who is breaking the law and who is not.  Really.  Specifically, he or she gets to decide who and why the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) applies to.

Every three years, those people who got an exemption before have to go back to the Librarian and ask, again, mother may I?

One example is that the Librarian said that you can circumvent encryption and DRM tools to jailbreak your phone.

Another exemption allows educators to use encrypted DVDs (and break that encryption) in certain educational settings.

None of this gives you the tools to actually do it, but they can’t put you in jail or fine you millions of dollars if you succeed.

The newest addition to the list of approved exemptions from DMCA is for the right to repair movement, a growing group that says that people should have the right to repair things that they bought like cars, iphones and tractors.  John Deere, for example, said that while a farmer bought the metal pieces of that million dollar combine, they do not own the software that actually makes it work when you turn it on and if you don’t let an authorized John  Deere mechanic fix it, they will try to sue you into oblivion.

Now people can try to fix their cars, tractors, iphones and other devices.  It doesn’t mean that the manufacturers will help you – it just means that they can no longer sue you.  Source: Motherboard .

Iran (?) Attacks Saudi Central Bank and Other Saudi Agencies

Starting in mid November, someone, possibly Iran, wiped many computers at a number of Saudi government agencies, including the Saudi Civil Aviation Agency .  A total of 6 agencies were attacked; 4 were compromised; 2 agencies repelled the attack.

The attack was made to look identical to an attack attributed to Iran in 2012 where tens of thousands of computers at the Saudi Aramco oil company were destroyed.

How “destroyed” is also unclear.  In the case of the Aramco attack, the oil company chose to be ultra cautious and replaced the disk drives in those 35,000 computers, causing a spike on the global market for disk drives.  We don’t know what they plan to do regarding this attack or how many computers were affected.

This is kind of similar to the attack on Sony, attributed to North Korea and the less successful attack 6 months before Sony on Sheldon Adelson’s Sands Hotel chain.

Since the Aramco attack is pretty public, someone wanting to cast a shadow of guilt on Iran (such as the CIA, KGB or Mossad) could have certainly planted the malware to stir up trouble.  We just don’t know.

For the soon-to-be-president Trump, this could get messy.  If he decides that it was Iran and that the U.S. needs to retaliate (big IF), then this escalates things.  It is pretty clear that the Iranians and their allies could certainly attack U.S. infrastructure – whether it is the San Francisco Metro or Gorilla Glue, if all they want to do is cause mischief, there are certainly plenty of soft targets.  If they want to get ugly, they could try for a critical infrastructure attack like the Russians did in Ukraine last year.  That could really get ugly.

The Saudis have not released much information about the attack; likely more will leak out over time, but how much and when is unknown.

Was it the Iranians?  Were they testing Trump?  Who knows, but get some buttered popcorn and stay tuned for the show.

Information for this post came from Bloomberg.

 

[TAG:Breach]