Tag Archives: Shadow Brokers

Security News for the Week Ending May 10, 2019

Hackers Wiping Github and Other Repos

Hackers are attacking repositories of users on Github, Gitlab and Bitbucket, leaving a ransom note that says pay up if you want your software back.

The ransom isn’t much – around $500, – which may cause people to pay up rather than trying to recover the data, which I assume is their strategy.

One possibility is that users have the password embedded in other repositories in clear text and the hackers were able to find those passwords.

Key point here is to make sure that you have backups OF ALL OF YOUR CLOUD BASED DATA.  Today it is Github;  tomorrow it is something else.  If you care about your data, make sure that it is securely backed up.  Offline backups are best because it is hard to wipe something that is not connected.  Source: Bleeping Computer.

 

Remember Shadow Brokers – China Already Had the Tools That Were Released

Remember all the fury a few years ago when Shadow Brokers released a whole bunch of NSA hacking tools?  Symantec now says that China already had those tool a year earlier and was using them against others.  Was NSA hacked?  Apparently not – China captured the NSA tools that were being used on them and repurposed them.

It is hard to keep these tools under check.  If you use them people will likely discover that fact and if they are motivated, they may use them against you.   In this case, China used them hacking targets in at least 5 countries including one telecom carrier where they got access to hundreds of thousands or millions of private communications.

After Shadow Brokers released the tools, China felt even bolder to use them because now they weren’t secret any more and would soon be patched.

Keeping these secrets under wraps is basically impossible.  Source:  The NY Times.

Israel Blows Up Palestinian Hackers

In an unusual move, Israel blew up a building that it said was used by Hamas for cyber attacks – in direct response to current or future Hamas cyber attacks, according to a press release from the IDF.

Neither side is saying much beyond that Israel did blow up the building.  No one is saying if there were casualties.

Apparently this facility was known to the Israelis.  This points to the likely escalation of cyber war into kinetic war as large countries fear what small countries can do in cyberspace.  This likely causes an escalation into cyber warriors operating out of spaces which would cause collateral damage if bombed, such as schools, hospitals and shopping malls.  Source: Gizmodo.

 

A Few More Details On Cyber Attack Against Western US Power Utility

We are hearing a few more details about the cyber attack on a so-far unnamed western US power utility.

The attackers, it is now being anonymously reported disabled the utility’s Cisco ASAs.  This is particularly scary since Cisco is pretty much the 800 pound gorilla in that space and their Adaptive Security Appliance is used by hundreds of thousands (or more) of businesses.  It is certainly possible that the ASAs were configured insecurely or missing patches (security patches are typically not available to owners unless they have a paid up maintenance plan, which I HOPE an electric utility would have).

Given how critical the electrical grid is in the US and how fragile it is, this is a bit of a wake up call for those utilities (water, power, gas, phone, Internet, etc.) that have not yet drunk the security Kool-Aid.  Source: EENews.

 

Navy May Be Getting Serious About Cybersecurity

Last year the Navy decided that having a CIO was superfluous and eliminated the position as unnecessary (See article).   They decided that the Undersecretary of the Navy could manage all those pesky IT and security details in his spare time.

In March the Navy released a SCATHING report on how bad their cybersecurity really was.  Now they are working on asking Congress to approve adding a position at the Assistant Secretary level, responsible for IT and security.

They also are looking at training (too basic) and discipline (can cyber-mistakes get you fired).

There is a report due June 1 outlining the roles, responsibilities and staffing for a Assistant secretary for cyber with a plan to role it out in July.  March.  June.  July.  This is amazingly fast for an organization as large as the Navy.

WHAT ARE THE OTHER SERVICES DOING?  Source: Defense Systems.

 

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Between Snowden and Shadow Broker, NSA has a Problem

The NSA hasn’t had a great few years.  And it isn’t getting any better.

First it was Snowden and dumping documents on seemingly a weekly basis.  There were two schools of thought regarding Snowden.  Some said he was a hero for disclosing illegal government actions  Others said that he was a traitor for disclosing national security secrets.  The leaks seem to have stopped at this point.  For now!

There are a couple of important distinctions about Snowden.  First, we know who he is and where he is.  Second, he disclosed documentation.  Directions.  Information.

The second major breach is the Shadow Brokers.  Where Snowden leaked documents, Shadow Brokers leaked tools.  Going back to those distinctions, we do not know WHO the Shadow Brokers are or WHERE they are.  These tools are now available on the open market and while some of the flaws these tools exploited have been patched, it doesn’t mean that people have applied those patches.  Remember the WannaCry infection that cost Fedex $300 million and Merck $600 million – so far?  Yup.  One of those tools that was released.  And for which there were patches issued but not applied.  And that was only ONE of the tools.

The New York Times ran a great article on the issue yesterday (see link below) that talks about how these breaches have affected the NSA (and the CIA with its own leaks).

The problem is that with so many employees and contractors, and the ease with which someone can sneak out a gigabyte of data on a device the size of your finger tip, it is a hard problem.

So they have been conducting witch hunts.  Given that they don’t know who or how many bad guys there are, they really don’t have much of a choice, but that certainly doesn’t improve morale.

One of the guys the Times interviewed for the article was a former TAO operative.  TAO is the NSA’s most elite group of hackers.  He said that Shadow Broker had details that even most of his fellow NSA employees didn’t have, so exactly how big is this leak anyway?  And is the leaker still there?  Is the leaker an insider?  Or have the Ruskies totally penetrated the NSA?

And, of course, the NSA has to start over finding new bugs in systems since the vendors have, in many cases, patched the bugs that the NSA tools used.  Then we have that NSA developer in Vietnam who took homework and ultimately fed it to the Ruskies – not on purpose, but the effect is the same.

It just hasn’t been a good couple of years for the NSA or the intelligence community.  On the other hand, as we hear more about the hacking of the elections last year, the Russians seem to be doing pretty well.

One last thought before I wrap this up.

The government, many years ago, decided that OFFENSIVE security was much more important than DEFENSIVE security.  This is why the NSA hordes security vulnerabilities instead of telling the vendors to fix them.  Maybe that is an idea that needs to change.  It certainly does not seem to be working out very well for the American citizens and businesses.

Until that happens, you are pretty much on your own.  Just sayin’.

Information for this post came from a great article in the New York Times.

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Follow On To Last Week’s Posts On Patching And CERT Alert

As a follow on to last week’s posts on why patching is critical and the CERT alert on The Shadow Broker’s release of a whole raft of firewall hacks, this week Cisco is announcing that their software is vulnerable to attack, there is no workaround and they are working on patches.  BUT, there is a silver lining.

First, the problem.  There is a bug in their implementation of the IKE key exchange protocol that is used by their VPN access routines.

Now the good news.

  • The bug affects IOS XR versions 4.3.x to 5.2.x, but releases 5.3 x and newer are not affected
  • The bug also affects PIX firewalls version 6.x and prior, but versions 7.0 and later are not affected.

IOS XR 5.3 was released last January.

Cisco PIX has reached end of life status and is not supported anymore.

So first, we are already seeing fallout from the Shadow Broker release and Cisco, at least, is starting to issue patches.

Second, if you are being good about patches and not running obsolete software,  at least in this case, you would not be vulnerable to this particular exploit.

This just reinforces my comment from last week to be religious about patching.  It is critical.

Information for this post came from Network World.

For a complete list of all software affected, read the Cisco announcement here.

 

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