Tag Archives: SolarWinds

Security News for the Week Ending April 2, 2021

SolarWinds Hackers Got Emails of Former Acting Illegal Head of DHS

Chad Wolf, former temporary acting head of DHS, that a federal court said was illegally appointed, has another item for his resume. When the Russians hacked DHS by way of SolarWinds, they obtained Wolf’s emails. Try to comprehend, for a moment, the intelligence value to Russia of whatever was in his email. DHS has not commented on that subject, but suffice it to say, this is not good. Credit: Cybernews

US Special Operations Command Buys Location Data

SOCOM paid $500,000 to buy data harvested from apps on your phone. The company, Anomaly 6, is pretty secretive. The WSJ picked up the contract info, so they are probably getting more attention than they had gotten in the last year. Founded by ex-military and location industry execs, it seems to have contracts with DoD and the intelligence community. SOCOM says that the $589,500 deal was an evaluation of their data for an overseas environment. SOCOM does a lot of work tracking down bad guys in the Middle East and Africa, so you can probably connect the dots. No one is saying and this is likely no more illegal than SOCOM buying pens from Staples – for better or for worse. Credit: Vice

A Potential Resume Generating Event

Strategic Command, the folks responsible for launching nuclear missiles, sent the following Tweet

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Is this a launch code on Twitter? No. but here is a real world danger of Work From Home. Note to self – lock your computer before leaving.

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Intel Sued Over Capturing User Keystroke data

Have you ever visited a web site, started filling out a form but didn’t submit it, and the site owner contacted you anyway. The way they do that is via software on the web site that records your keystrokes as you type. One of the companies that does that is Intel. Another is Google. There is a current class action lawsuit in Florida that accuses Intel of wiretapping. I’m not a lawyer, but that seems like a stretch. Still, if you are using keystroke monitoring software on your website, you probably should watch this lawsuit closely. Credit: Threatpost

Sierra Wireless Withdraws Financial Guidance Completely After Ransomware

Sierra Wireless, a major Internet of Things vendor, reported that they were the target of ransomware last week. As a result, they halted production at their manufacturing plants. Not only did the attack shut down many of their internal systems, but it forced the company to withdraw the financial performance numbers that they had released just a month earlier. There are a couple of potential reasons why they shut manufacturing down. One of those reasons might be that they are concerned that the attackers were able to compromise code going into those products and they did not want to be the next SolarWinds. Credit: SC Magazine

Security News for the Week Ending February 26, 2021

DoD Working on CMMC-Fedramp ‘Reciprocity’ by Year End

CMMC, the DoD’s new cybersecurity standard is designed to measure security practices of companies and the servers in the computer rooms and data centers. But what about the stuff in the cloud. That is covered by another government standard called FedRAMP. But those two standards have different rules and contractors who have both need to figure out how to comply with two competing standards. DoD is working on this and plans to have a solution by September. One challenge is that FedRAMP allows for a ‘To-Do’ list – stuff we will fix when we get to it and CMMC does not. Harmonizing these two standards is critical for defense contractors. Credit: Defense Systems

The Risk of NSA’s Offensive Security Strategy

The NSA has, for decades, favored offensive security (hacking others) over defensive security (protecting us). The Obama administration created a process called the vulnerabilities equities process to try and rationalize keeping bugs secret to use against others vs. telling vendors so that they could fix them. Check Point research published a report talking about one failure where the Chinese figured out the bug we were using, one way or another and used it against us. That is the danger of offensive security. Read the details here. Credit: The Register

HINT: When Your Vendor Tells You it is Time to Upgrade – Listen

Airplane maker Bombardier is the latest entry into the club of companies who were compromised with Accellion’s decades old FTA file transfer system. What was likely stolen was intellectual property. Accellion has been trying to get customers off this decades old platform for 5 years. Now they say they are going to formally end-of-life the old software in April. 300 customers did not listen. At least 100 were compromised. Credit: ZDNet

Microsoft Asks Congress to Force Companies to Disclose Breaches

Microsoft’s president Brad Smith testified at a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing this week about the SolarWinds breach. Smith said that the private sectors should be legally obligated to disclose any major hacks. None of the other CEOs who testified argued with Smith. The details of who, how, when, etc. are note easy to figure out as is the penalty for breaking the law. I suspect that the overwhelming majority of breaches are never reported to anyone because there is no incentive to do so. Credit: The Register

DHS-CISA Reveals Authentication Bypass of Rockwell Factory Controllers

Rockwell industrial automation controllers used in places like factory floors can be compromised by a remote hacker if they can install some malware on the network. The bug has a severity score of 10 out of 10. The compromise would allow hackers to upload firmware of their choosing and download data from the controller. The bug was initially disclosed to Rockwell in 2019. Credit: Security Week