Tag Archives: Vietnam

Security News for the Week Ending Nov 13, 2020

The “S” in Coworking Stands for Security

While the WSJ says that coworking companies are closing money losing spaces as a result of Covid, don’t forget that coworking spaces are about as secure as airport WiFi, meaning not at all. The local news just said that some coworking companies are actually expanding as people want to get out of their house. For most coworking companies, the users are on a shared WiFi connection with no security and often, no encryption. Your remote working policy and procedures need to address this subject, based on the level of risk you are willing to accept and whether you are part of a regulated industry that might frown on you sharing your trade secrets, PII or customer data with the world. Also remember, that if malware gets into shared WiFi, it will certainly try to attack you. Here are a few tips for coworking company security.

Travelers are Faking Covid-19 Test Results

Apparently some travelers don’t want to go through the hassle of getting tested for Covid but still want to travel to countries that require those tests to enter the country. First there were paper documents, which, with Photoshop, were easy to forge. The cops in Paris’ Charles de Gaulle Airport just arrested some of those forgers. They were charging $180-$360 for fake documents. Apparently the French do not cotton to counterfeiters. The penalty for counterfeiting Covid documents is 5 years in a French prison and a half million dollar fine. Brazil arrested some tourists last month for presenting fake documents, so it sounds like you can get in trouble whether you are the buyer or the seller. Some locales are now only accepting electronic versions of the documents from the labs, making it harder to fake. Credit: USAToday

Google Finds At Least 7 Critical Bugs in Chrome, Android, iOS and Windows

Google says the bugs were being actively exploited int the wild, but are not saying by whom or against whom. The iOS 12 patch released patches back to iPhone 5S and 6, typically indicating that it is a big problem. The bugs were “found” by Google’s Project Zero, but apparently were being used by someone(s) prior to them being found. Does this smell like some spies were caught? Probably. We just don’t know which side they were on. Credit: Vice

Vietnam’s OceanLotus Hacking Group Joins Other Countries in Hacks

While countries like China get all the credit for hacking, Russia, North Korea and others are just as active. Add Vietnam to the list. Right now they are attacking their Asian neighbors. As is typical for these government run attacks, they are applying a great deal of effort to compromise their victims. Credit: The Record

White House May Fire Krebs for Securing the Election

Chris Krebs, the head of DHS’s Cybersecurity agency CISA, says he expects to be fired by the White House for securing the election from hackers. All reports indicate that while there is a lot more work to do to secure elections, the 2020 elections were, by far, the most secure ever. The agency also created an election rumor control web site (www.cisa.gov/rumorcontrol). This website debunked many of the myths being spread people who are trying to discredit the election results. General Nakasone, head of NSA and Cyber Command, who also said that there was no significant election fraud, could also be in trouble. Credit: Darkreading

Security News for the Week Ending May 1, 2020

China, Korea, Vietnam Escalate Hacking During Covid-19 Outbreak

The Trump administration is calling out China for hacking our hospitals and research facilities who are looking for cures and vaccines for Covid-19. That should not be much of a surprise since China has always opted for stealing solutions vs. figuring them out themselves. At least that this point, the U.S. is not doing anything about this theft. Credit: CNN

At the same time, Vietnam is hacking at China’s Ministry of Emergency Management and the Wuhan government, probably trying to do the same thing and also steal information on their neighbor’s lies about their death toll. Credit: Reuters

Finally, South Korea’s Dark Hotel government hacking group is hacking at China, using 5 zero-day vulnerabilities in one attack. 5 is a massive arsenal to use in one attack, since zero-days are hard to find (or at least we think they are. Since they are unknown until they get used or announced, we don’t really know). Reports are that the group has compromised 200+ VPN servers in an effort to infiltrate the Chinese government and other Chinese institutions. Credit: Cyberscoop

Bottom line, it is business as usual, with everyone hacking everyone they can.

Israel Thwarts Major Coordinated Cyber-Attack on its Water Infrastructure

Israel says that they have reports on coordinated attacks on their wastewater, pumping and sewage infrastructure.

The response was to tell companies to take their systems off the Internet as much as possible, change passwords and update software. All good things to do but disconnecting from the Internet likely makes companies unable to operate, since most plants run “lights out” – with no onsite staff.

The attacks took place on Friday and Saturday – during the Jewish Sabbath when the least people would be around to detect and respond. Credit: The Algemeiner

Surveillance Company Employee Used Company’s Tool to Hack Love Interest

An employee of hacking tool vendor NSO Group, who was working on site at a customer location, broke into the office of the customer and aimed the software at a “love interest”.

While vendors like to claim that they are righteous and above reproach, the reality is that they have little control over what employees do. Even the NSA seems to have trouble with reports of their analysts sharing salacious images that they come across.

in fact, the “insider threat” problem as it is referred to is a really difficult problem to solve. In this case, the employee set off an alarm when he broke into the office where the authorized computer was located and was caught and fired. Most do not get caught. Credit: Vice

Over 1,000 Public Companies List Ransomware as Risk

In case you had any doubt about the risk that ransomware represents, over 1,000 publicly traded companies list ransomware as a risk to future earnings in their 10K, 10Q and other SEC filings. Companies only have to list items that have the potential to be material to earnings, so it is usually a relatively short list. Four months into 2020, 700 companies have already mentioned ransomware is on that short list. Credit: ZDNet

Nearly 3 in 5 Americans Don’t Trust Apple-Google Covid Tracking Tech

The authorities want to track the contacts of anyone who who tests positive for Covid-19. The way they want to do this is by getting everyone to install an app on their smartphone. 1 in 6 (16%) Americans don’t even have a smartphone. For the high risk group, these over 65, only 50% have smartphones and for those over 75, it is even less.

Resistance is higher among Republicans and those that think they are at lower risk. Only 17% of all smartphone owners said they would Definitely use it.

The main reason for resistance is that people don’t trust Apple, Google and others to keep their data private. Even if the tech companies wanted to keep it private, the government could demand that they hand it over. Credit: Washington Post

News Bites for the Week Ending January 4, 2019

Vietnam’s New Cybersecurity Law in Effect

Vietnam’s new “cybersecurity” law which requires companies to remove any content from the Internet that the government finds offensive went into effect on January 1.

It also requires some companies like Facebook and Google to open offices in Vietnam if they want to continue to do business there.

The law prohibits individuals from spreading anti-government information.  The Vietnam Association of Journalists announced a new code of conduct prohibiting reporters from posting anything on the Internet that “runs counter” to the state.

Google has apparently agreed to open an office there, although they are being somewhat sly about it;  Facebook does not seem to have committed to that.

Companies will need to decide if the income from Vietnam is worth the risk.  Source: South China Morning Post.

 

Android Apps Send Data to Facebook without User Permission

Apparently the Facebook software development kit did not even give app developers the option not to send data to Facebook until a month after GDPR went into effect.

Apps that have not updated their software are likely still sending data, probably without user consent, to Facebook, even if the user does not have a Facebook account.

Some apps send data to Facebook the second they are opened; others, like travel apps, send data to Facebook every time you search for a flight.

Integrating the data from various apps, Facebook could determine your religion (prayer app), gender (period app), employment status (job search app) and travel plans including number of children traveling (travel app).

Example apps are prayer apps, MyFitnessPal, Kayak, Indeed, Spotify, TripAdvisor and others.  The test was against Android apps, so it is not clear if the Apple Facebook library does the same thing.

Facebook admitted that they have a problem. Source: Android Police.

Both Facebook and the app developers could be on the hook for fines of $20 million Euros or more for violating GDPR.

Hackers Leak Private Info on 100s of German Politicians

Hackers leaked sensitive data on German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Brandenburg’s prime minister Dietmar Woidke, along with other politicians, artists and journalists.

Leaked information includes private conversations, photo IDs, credit card information,bills and other personal info.

Germany’s Federal Office of Information Security, who is investigating this said that government computers were not affected.  Other than covering their own butts, it is not clear why they would say that since no one suggested that government computers were being attacked.

This does point out that protecting your phones and tablets by making sure they are patched (many older phones do not have patches available and are therefore vulnerable if people use them to log on to web sites that contain email and other personal info), that applications on them are patched and unneeded applications are removed is very important.  Unfortunately, older devices for which there are no patches should be replaced.  Details here.

 

Lloyd’s of London Denies THEY Were Hacked; Throws Partner Hiscox Under the Bus

As a follow up to a blog post from earlier this week, hackers have now posted a sample of docs related to 9/11 lawsuits reportedly hacked from Lloyds and Hiscox.

Lloyd’s claims that they were not hacked but rather their business partner Hiscox was hacked.

Nice of them proclaim themselves innocent while throwing their partner under the bus.  No doubt this was an effort to divert lawsuits from them to Hiscox.  I will point out that this likely won’t work since a client of Lloyd’s has no agreement with or ability to select or control Lloyd’s vendors.  This is yet another reason why we are so adamant about companies implementing robust vendor cyber risk management programs.  Read details here.