Tag Archives: Vulcan forge

Security News for the Week Ending December 17, 2021

The Gift That Keeps on Giving – Log4j – List of Affected Vendors

First, get used to hearing about this. It will be haunting us for months, at least. Jen Easterly, current head of DHS’s CISA and formerly at NSA and a professor at the US Military Academy at West Point says this may be THE WORST vulnerability she has seen in her career. As of Monday, here is a list of affected vendors. If you use any of these vendors, and it looks like a who’s who of computer software, watch for patches. Second, it looks like the first patch for Log4j, 2.15, didn’t close the hole and now there is a new release, 2.16. This will keep evolving, so if you are a company that uses software, this applies to you.

From Friday through Tuesday researchers tracked more than 840,000 attempted attacks looking for the Log4J vulnerability. They are only getting started. Credit: Ars Technica

Hackers Hit Third Cryptocurrency Company This Month-Total Haul is Over $400 Mil

Vulcan Forge is the next cryptocurrency company to get hit by hackers. They stole about $135 million from them. If you get the sense that cryptocurrency software is buggy and processes are weak, you have it about right. In VulcanForge’s case, since it is decentralized, there is no central authority to block the movement of stolen currency. This is not going to end anytime soon. Credit: Vice

Apple Airtags Make a Wonderful Stalking Tool

Stalkers are using Apple Airtags to stalk people. A woman in Arkansas, for example, got into her car and her iPhone told her that an airtag was following her. She found the tag on her trunk. If a stalker tried to hide it, say under her car somewhere, it would be more difficult to find. Apple says that Android users can detect a rogue Airtag because it will beep if it is separated from its owner for more than three days (assuming that is the case).

Credit: Apple Insider and Daily Kos. Apple has released an Android app to detect rogue trackers, but how many Android users are going to even think of downloading an Apple app. Credit: PC Mag

Feds Don’t Quite Handle Incident Response

A backdoor in the network of the United States Commission on International Religious Freedom has allowed attackers to intercept, and likely exfiltrate, all local network traffic on the agency’s systems. Security firm Avast discovered the intrusion in May, spoke the agency’s executive director and even talked to CISA. After getting no follow-up for months, Avast published their findings. Avast says that due to lack of communications from the Agency, they don’t know if they fixed the problem. They have since reached out to other agencies and NGOs focused on international rights to warn them. Maybe they fixed the problem right away? Who knows? Credit: Data Breach Today